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Posts Tagged: Shakespeare

Who Cares Who Wrote Shakespeare?

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At Guernica, Tana Wojczuk shares her personal story of seeing Shakespeare performed as a child and her eventual realization and understanding of Shakespeare’s humor, and defends the importance of seeing Shakespeare’s works on stage: This is one of the reasons it was important to see Shakespeare performed, and not just to read him. Many of Shakespeare’s […]

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In Favor of Reading the Literary Canon

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The canon is what it is, and anyone who wishes to understand how it continues to flow forward needs to learn to swim around in it. Responding to Yale students’ protesting the English department’s course requirements, Slate’s Katy Waldman argues that English majors should still have to read the “sexist, racist, colonialist, and totally gross” […]

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Such Stuff as Dreams Are Made On

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This past weekend, thousands of people convened to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death. The Elizabethan bard’s formal innovations are widely revered as some of the most influential literary developments in history, so much so that we almost overlook what he was even writing about: …for Shakespeare, life itself is a type of lie.

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The Conversation: Jeremy Clark and Thiahera Nurse

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I’m thinking about the difference between “I stay somewhere” and “I live somewhere.”

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What Country… Should Give You Harbour?

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Allison Meier writes at Hyperallergic on a speech, recently digitized by the British Library, that proves to be the only example of Shakespeare’s handwriting other than a few signatures. The excerpt comes from Sir Thomas More, a play written in collaboration, wherein the title character asks for sympathy for migrants, driven from their homes and countries.

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The Sunday Rumpus Essay: How To Make Sure Your Writing Is Forgotten

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Do you really want to have to listen from the grave as students discuss your themes and scholars analyze your syntax and trace your influence?

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The First Bohemian

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The Public Domain Review examines the work of Elizabethan writer Robert Greene, the original Bohemian, and the first known reviewer of William Shakespeare: Greene’s chief target was “an upstart Crow,” who “supposes he is as well able to bombast out a blank verse as the best of you”…He has a “tiger’s heart, wrapped in a […]

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Celebrating Shakespeare

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Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin have found a unique way of honoring the Bard on the upcoming 400th anniversary of his death: a digital re-creation of a popular British museum dedicated to Shakespeare. According to the New York Times: The digital re-creation—the first detailed visualization of the gallery, scholars say—gives a glimpse […]

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Nobler in Modern Language than the Mind

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Earlier this month, the Oregon Shakespeare Festival commissioned thirty-six playwrights to “translate” Shakespearean plays into modern English. Not everyone is happy about this. However, Sheila T. Cavanagh over at The New Republic argues there is nothing wrong with modernizing Shakespeare. While updated versions of Shakespeare traditionally focus on settings and costumes rather than language, it is no […]

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David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: Old Friends Or Lovers

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I was becoming awed by the wide horizon of the speech that arose out of an individual life lived in a single era and generation. I was becoming attracted to the writer’s creativity.

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You Don’t Mess with Shakespeare

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Shakespeare is about the intoxicating richness of the language… It’s like the beer I drink. I drink 8.2 per cent I.P.A., and by changing the language in this modernizing way, it’s basically shifting to Bud Light. Bud Light’s acceptable, but it just doesn’t pack the punch and the excitement and the intoxicating quality of that […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Christopher Moore

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Christopher Moore discusses his latest book, Secondhand Souls, the permanence of place in San Francisco, Michael Bay’s take on marine biology, and why everyone from Shakespeare nerds to goth teens trusts him to deliver laughs.

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Rewrite, Reboot, Remix

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Rewriting the classics has become a stale and risk-averse strategy. But that shouldn’t spoil the fun of our larger culture of remixing.

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On Unequal Publishing

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Over at the Ploughshares blog, Cathe Shubert discusses the historic nature of sexism in the publishing industry, and urges her readers to keep searching for an early canon of women writers: Despite the many gains we have made in including women in our understanding of the history of literature, many students graduate with the false understanding that […]

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The Creative Writing Class That Changed My Life

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One could sense this passion in all of us. It seemed to fill the classroom as if it were part of the oxygen.

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The Moral of the Story

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At the New York Times, Alice Gregory and Pankaj Mishra discuss the role of moralism in the novel—and conclude that authors should seek to question and provoke rather than preach: Not only does moral preoccupation corrupt the artfulness of fiction, but fiction is an inefficient and insincere vehicle for moralizing. If an author’s motive is to […]

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