Posts Tagged: Shakespeare

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #153: Julie Schumacher

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“I have to confess here that I never studied Shakespeare in college.”

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The Torment of Queer Literature

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Queer literature isn’t a box to unlock so that it can unlock me.

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Motivation and Humanity: A Conversation with Carrie La Seur

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Carrie La Seur discusses her new novel, The Weight of an Infinite Sky, standing up for what you know is right, and the writers who inspire her.

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The Neoliberal Heart of the 90s Romcom

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The personal is political, to the extent that politics itself can be effectively effaced with no detrimental effects.

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Writing History

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I was pretty sure I could produce a manuscript superior to anything [this editor had] ever published before by letting my cat walk over my keyboard a few times.

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The Rumpus 2017 Holiday Gift Guide

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We’ve gathered up our favorite gifting ideas this holiday season and put them together into one handy list!

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Interrogating the English Language with Safiya Sinclair

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To be forced to speak in the language of the colonist, the language of the oppressor, while also carrying within us the storm of Jamaican patois, we live under a constant hurricane of our doubleness.

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #63: Patrick Madden

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Patrick Madden teaches writing at Brigham Young University and is the author of the essay collection Quotidiana. His essays frequently appear in literary magazines and have been featured in The Best Creative Nonfiction and The Best American Spiritual Writing anthologies. He pays close attention to the details of the every day, infusing humor and self-deprecation, combining […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Imbolo Mbue

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Imbolo Mbue discusses her debut novel Behold the Dreamers, teaching herself how to write a novel, and the price of the American Dream.

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Barbara Berman’s 2016 Holiday Poetry Shout-Out

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Barbara Berman offers suggestions for your poetry and poetics holiday gift-giving needs.

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The Old Fetal Narrative

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Maybe it has something to do with the watery world that a fetus inhabits—our words taking on the summersaulting quality of an internal water ballet.

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #58: James Steven Sadwith

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A self-described “actor’s director,” James Steven Sadwith has been writing, directing, and producing television movies, miniseries, and dramas for nearly three decades—and is perhaps best known for his work on the lives of Frank Sinatra and Elvis. But for Coming through the Rye, his first feature film for the big screen, Sadwith comes closer to […]

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Shakespeare in Boston

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Boston Public Library aims to cut through 400 years of literary analysis and explore the pages of Shakespeare’s original writings, including some of his most famous works. The Boston Public Library has a new exhibition, “Shakespeare Unauthorized,” which features four Shakespearean folios and other artifacts, Talia Avakian reports for Travel + Leisure. Visit the library’s website to […]

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Baby Geniuses

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The concepts of genius and IQ have long been instruments of cultural and economic control. For Slate, Dana Goldstein examines how Donald Trump has bought into these ideas: Trump’s adoration of IQ testing recalls an especially disturbing period in the history of genius: the late 19th and early 20th century, when social scientists attempted to […]

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Shakespeare Didn’t Make up as Many Words as We Think

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For the Guardian, Alison Flood writes on the bias of the Oxford English Dictionary towards “famous literary examples” instead of the actual origin, resulting in the incorrect attribution of several still-used words and phrases to Shakespeare. Flood writes that there are multitudes of evidence showing earlier usages of phrases such as “wild goose chase” and “it’s Greek […]

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By the People, for the People

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At Guernica, Tana Wojcznick unpacks Shakespeare’s lesser-known and often-misread play, Coriolanus, to bring us s its timely political warning about populism and democracy: It’s no accident that Coriolanus is not a favorite in America, where it’s rarely included in the mini-canon of plays each generation tends to play and re-play (such as King Lear today […]

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Jesse Lee Kercheval

The Saturday Rumpus Interview with Jesse Lee Kercheval

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I have learned to put myself, my ego, to one side and truly experience someone else’s poetry.

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Conceptualizing the Vagina

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At Lit Hub, Dr. Fay Bound Alberti shares an excerpt of her new book, This Mortal Coil: The Human Body in History and Culture, exploring the cultural understandings and depictions of female genitalia from Shakespeare’s “No thing” to Jamie McCartney’s The Great Wall of Vagina, and how those understandings are influenced by culture and vice versa.

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The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Janine Joseph

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The day the manuscript became Driving without a License was the day I said “yes” to the truth of my own life and coming-of-age experience as an undocumented immigrant.

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Who Cares Who Wrote Shakespeare?

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At Guernica, Tana Wojczuk shares her personal story of seeing Shakespeare performed as a child and her eventual realization and understanding of Shakespeare’s humor, and defends the importance of seeing Shakespeare’s works on stage: This is one of the reasons it was important to see Shakespeare performed, and not just to read him. Many of Shakespeare’s […]

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In Favor of Reading the Literary Canon

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The canon is what it is, and anyone who wishes to understand how it continues to flow forward needs to learn to swim around in it. Responding to Yale students’ protesting the English department’s course requirements, Slate’s Katy Waldman argues that English majors should still have to read the “sexist, racist, colonialist, and totally gross” […]

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