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Posts Tagged: The Handmaid’s Tale

Both Ways at Once: Talking with Helen Phillips

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Helen Phillips discusses her new novel, THE NEED.

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This Week in Indie Bookstores

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Indie bookstore news from across the country and around the world!

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A Very Precarious Moment: Talking with Karen Russell

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Karen Russell discusses her newest collection, ORANGE WORLD AND OTHER STORIES.

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What to Read When Women’s Bodies Are Under Attack

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Rumpus editors share a list of books to read as the fight for reproductive rights intensifies.

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The Reality of Love: Talking with Adrian Todd Zuniga

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Adrian Todd Zuniga discusses his debut novel, COLLISION THEORY.

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The Thread: The Masked Man

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What I know and don’t know about men matters. What men know and don’t know about themselves matters more.

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The Winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature Goes to… Kenny G

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Rumpus editors share our Nobel Prize in Literature predictions with you!

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What to Read When You Want to See a World More F**ked up Than Ours

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Reading suggestions from author Celeste Ng for these f**ked-up times: worlds more—or, okay, just differently—f**ked up than ours.

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What to Read When You Are a Girl in This Garbage-Fire World

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Our voices are our weapons, and in these books, young women speak, shout, and scream the truths that you are not alone, you are not forgotten, and you are not done fighting.

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #76: Chris Tusa

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Set in post-Katrina New Orleans, Chris Tusa’s second novel, In the City of Falling Stars (Livingston Press, September 2016), tells a tale of paranoia and intrigue. Maurice Delahoussaye witnesses dead birds falling from the sky, and becomes convinced the air is toxic. With equal parts humor and depravity, the novel chronicles a fractured family amidst a […]

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The Handmaid’s (Cautionary) Tale

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At The Establishment, Laura Beans discusses the importance of Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale as a predictive novel, drawing many connections between the novel and increasing attempts to control women’s bodies: Instead of seeming further from the truth, the novel’s warnings only seem to echo louder in recent years. Atwood’s analysis of her own twisted […]

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Make Me Believe

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The response to [the Handmaid’s Tale] was interesting. The English, who had already had their religious civil war, said, “Jolly good yarn.” The Canadians in their nervous way, said, “Could it happen here?” And the Americans said, “How long have we got?” For Lit Hub, Grant Munroe interviews Margaret Atwood on seemingly everything, touching on the […]

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