Posts Tagged: activism

In a Quicksand of Language: A Conversation with Krys Lee

By

Krys Lee discusses her debut novel, How I Became a North Korean, having empathy for people and characters, and finding the balance between real-world facts and imagination. ...more

From the Editors: On Charlottesville and White Supremacy

By

Rumpus editors share their thoughts on Charlottesville and white supremacy. When we have a platform to speak out against hatred and bigotry, we must use it to do so. ...more

There Is Simply No Time for This: Whose Streets? and Civil Rights Cinema

By

It is unlikely I will see the US justice system evolve toward an egalitarian ideal in my lifetime. But Whose Streets? does offer a clearly visible North Star. ...more

Fetishizing Distress: The Wrong Light and Sex Trafficking

By

Josie Swantek Heitz’s and Dave Adams’s The Wrong Light, theatrically released in NYC through Cinema Guild on July 14, is disturbing on several levels. First, there’s the story itself. The filmmakers set out to create a portrait of the Children’s Organization of Southeast Asia (COSA), a nonprofit boarding school of sorts founded in 2005 by Mickey Choothesa.

...more

I, Me, We, and the GOP

By

It’s not coincidental, I think, that most of the secular and sacred saints we venerate now went charging against the grain of the Municipal We. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #93: Barbara Browning

By

When I requested an interview from Barbara Browning to talk about her new novel, The Gift, she agreed and asked if I had a favorite song she could cover for me on the ukulele. Browning possesses many gifts—she is an accomplished dancer, novelist, performance artist, theorist, teacher, and self-described amateur musician—and The Gift is a rumination on the relationship between artistic giftedness and gift economies, an idea Browning borrowed from Lewis Hyde’s text by the same name.

...more

Make/Work Episode 40: Kate Schatz

By

In Episode 40 of The Rumpus's Make/Work podcast, host Scott Pinkmountain speaks with writer and activist Kate Schatz. ...more

The Storming Bohemian #34: Descent into the Underworld

By

The last time I punked the muse, I wrote of the summer solstice, a meditation into the heart of the sun. My goal was to leave behind the ever-more-depressing news cycle, and touch some place deep down where hope resides.

...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Lisa Factora-Borchers

By

Lisa Factora-Borchers talks about being a Catholic feminist, writing across genres, and pushing back against a singular narrative about New York. ...more

Reality Scooped: Talking with Tony Tulathimutte

By

Recent Whiting Award winner Tony Tulathimutte discusses his first novel, Private Citizens, the state of satire in 2017, “booby-trapping” identity politics, and productivity in the Internet age. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #87: Kai Cheng Thom

By

Rarely is birth silent for anyone involved. Silence, instead, is a learned phenomena. Unlearning silence can become its own birth, as it seems in Kai Cheng Thom’s debut poetry collection a place called No Homeland, opening with, “diaspora babies, we are born of pregnant pauses.” Pausing for readers to meet her at this natal location of identity and origin, Thom finds traces of her voice scattered across a map of a place she’s constantly retracing.

...more

The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Amy Benson

By

Our American obsession with the personal and individual has made us the tremendous resource consumers we are in the world. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: We Aren’t Killers; They Are

By

One story mirrors our identity—any of us could be falsely accused! The other tale is about the Other—because it’s unfathomable that one of us would commit murder. We aren’t killers; they are. ...more

Where You Put It on the Line: A Conversation with Mychal Denzel Smith

By

Mychal Denzel Smith discusses his debut nonfiction book Invisible Man, Got the Whole World Watching, how the activist space has changed in recent years, and who he is writing for. ...more

Slang and Swagger: Riffing with Jeff Chang

By

Jeff Chang discusses his latest book, We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, his work in hip-hip journalism, and the beauty and humanity of political protest. ...more

Conversations with Literary Ex-Cons: Billy Sinclair

By

Former death-row inmate, legendary jailhouse lawyer, and co-editor for the award-winning The Angolite newspaper Billy Sinclair looks back on his prison experience and discusses what his priorities are now. ...more

The Big Idea: Bill McKibben

By

Journalist and environmental activist Bill McKibben discusses whether our environmental crisis can be improved under our new political administration, climate change denial, and manifestations of resistance. ...more

The Storming Bohemian Punks the Muse #21: Not Yesterday’s Demonstrations

By

1972: War was waging in Vietnam and kids were coming home in boxes. Hippes and yippies went clean for Gene McCarthy, but George McGovern won the democratic nomination. Tricky Dick Nixon was the one for the Republicans and the so-called Silent Majority.

...more

Eggs as Protest Art

By

Eggs are an ancient symbol of fertility, but the artist Martha W. Lewis is also using them as a medium to express current political frustrations about alternative facts, election hacking, wall building—and threats to women’s reproductive rights. Lewis is one of more than three hundred visual, spoken word, and performance artists whose work is featured in “Nasty Women New Haven,” which opened at the Institute Library, 847 Chapel St., on March 9 and runs until April 8.

...more

We Brown Women

By

Our bodies will not be your banners. We are not yours to use and abuse, we are not yours to dupe. We see through your words, and we see your violence. ...more

This Week in Books: Direct Action: Protest and the Reinvention of American Radicalism

By

Welcome to This Week in Books, where we highlight books just released by small and independent presses. Books have always been a symbol for and means of spreading knowledge and wisdom, and they are an important part of our toolkit in fighting for social justice.

...more

“Man, You Better Watch Out”: Why Women Keep Marching Against Trump

By

[A protest's] job is to hearten the people who’re part of it, to let them look into the eyes of those who agree with them, to help them feel less alone. ...more

The Storming Bohemian Punks the Muse #18: Keeping Our Balance in a Time of Turkeys

By

Yesterday, walking home along the wet pavement twinkling under the sunshine, I spied a flock of no fewer than twenty-four wild turkeys parading down the street, mostly chicks.

I don’t see them today, as the rain has returned, and all is gray.

...more

The Storming Bohemian Punks the Muse #16: The Game Is On

By

Today is the day that Pr*sident Trump shut down the American borders to refugees, green card holders, and non-citizens with paid for and improved visas—if they were from certain “Muslim majority” countries… It is also the day his administration made it clear that, going forward, “Christian” refugees would be given priority over all other refugees—and then denied the existence of a religious test.

...more

Taking a Stand with Roxane

By

I wouldn’t have volunteered at The Rumpus for the past three years, if I didn’t believe in the power of words. But words ring hollow if they are not met with action. Outrage tweets and Facebook posts mean noting if you don’t march, call, email, filibuster, stand, sit-in, demand, riot, challenge, and vote.

...more

Who Run the World?

By

Look through these images, and feel proud. Feel inspired. Know that yes, the battle is uphill and will be hard-won, but it will be won. ...more

This Week in Trumplandia

By

Welcome to This Week in Trumplandia. Check in with us every Thursday for a weekly roundup of the most pertinent content on our country, which is currently spiraling down a crappy toilet drain. You owe it to yourself, your communities, and your humanity to contribute whatever you can, even if it is just awareness of the truth.

...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Tara Betts

By

Tara Betts discusses her newest collection, Break the Habit, the burden placed on black women artists to be both artist and activist, and why writing is rooted in identity. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Dawn Lundy Martin

By

Dawn Lundy Martin discusses her most recent collection, Life in a Box is a Pretty Life, the intersections between poetry and social justice, her wide variety of inspirations, and bathroom gender binaries. ...more

On Suffering and Sympathy

By

What is the distance between sympathy and action? How do we travel from one to the other? ...more