Posts Tagged: Facebook

Party of One

By

Social media is a cruel machine, propelled by our desire to keep up appearances and affirmed by a strange, voyeuristic capital of likes and favorites. While Facebook can at times feel like a digital cocktail party devoid of any significant personal connection, Julia Fierro, author of Cutting Teeth, makes a case for its value to those who struggle with anxiety and loneliness:

It is socializing on my own terms.

...more

Facebook as Storytelling Medium

By

From the epic poems of old to postmodernist novels, humans have always told stories.

For the Millions, Annie Abrams looks at how Facebook affects our storytelling, applying narrative/literary insights from folks like J. M. Coetzee and Ralph Waldo Emerson. A preview:

What happens, though, to the identities we take on in moments of freedom from the sort of temporality Facebook advocates — the first two weeks of college; a short affair with someone regrettable while traveling; isolated months spent thinking about a dissertation?

...more

Less Face, More Book for These Reclusive Authors

By

Though it can be hard to remember between tweeting at your favorite writer and joining a Facebook event page for a reading, there was a time when many authors led reclusive lives with minimal self-promotion.

Bookish has rounded up a list of some of the most private (Salinger, Pynchon)—and their modern-day, super-public opposites (John Green, Susan Orlean).

...more

Slow Clap

By

Megan Garber gives an exceptionally detailed breakdown of applause in this essay, which analyzes the history and evolution of the everyday gesture.

So the subtleties of the Roman arena — the claps and the snaps and the shades of meaning — gave way, in later centuries, to applause that was standardized and institutionalized and, as a result, a little bit promiscuous.

...more

The Sexism That Makes Facebook Run

By

When Katherine Losse’s The Boy Kings, a book about the sexist culture she encountered while working at Facebook during its early days, came out, Melissa Gira Grant paid attention.

Grant had worked for a Silicon Valley gossip blog during the same time period and had come to her own dismayed conclusions about women’s roles in the tech industry.

...more

Trouble In Nipple Paradise

By

The New Yorker recently posted a cartoon which features a naked, and post-coital, Adam and Eve to their Facebook page. What resulted was a kerfuffle between the magazine and social media site over their nudity regulation policies. Specifically, Facebook took issue with Eve’s cartoon nipples, leading to the magazine’s Facebook page being temporarily shut down.

...more

Abraham Lincoln: Facebook Inventor

By

In 1845, Abraham Lincoln tried–and failed–to patent the The Springfield Gazette, a personal paper with striking similarities to our modern day Book of Faces. Here’s the full story.

“He went on to propose that ‘each Man may decide if he shall make his page Available to the entire Town, or only to those with whom he has established Family or Friendship.’ Evidently there was to be someone overseeing this collection of documents, and he would somehow know which pages anyone could look at, and which ones only certain people could see…”

UPDATE: Too good to be true, folks.

...more

TPM Switches to Facebook Comments

By

In an interesting move, popular political site Talking Points Memo will begin using Facebook comments as their main commenting system. TPM Editor John Marshall explains the decision here.

“…To make an admittedly long story short, we’re switching to Facebook comments because building or maintaining our own system does not seem like a good use of our company resources and because we believe fixed identities will make the comment threads more civilized, engaging and less threatened by marauding trolls and bad (comment) actors.”

...more

Mass Unfriending

By

“The idea of ‘cleaning out’ Facebook friends is getting more popular: The percentage of people unfriending other Facebook members rose from 56 percent in 2009 to 63 percent in 2011.  In gross terms, 158 million people were unfriended in 2009, and more than a half a billion in 2011.”

GOOD explores the potential implications of this epidemic on the company’s interconnectedness, advertising, and investing.

...more

Using Facebook to Incite Riots now Punishable by Law in the UK

By

Two young adult males–Jordan Blackshaw, 20, and Perry Sutcliffe-Keenan, 22–both just received four-year sentences for using Facebook to incite a riot in their Cheshire hometown that never happened.  Despite the announcement over Facebook concerning the riots that were purportedly going to occur, no one showed up to these locations apart from the police.

...more

French Faux Pas

By

A twenty year-old French law that sought to keep the news media from promoting commercial enterprises is being newly reinforced.

This means that using “Facebook” and “Twitter” on air is strictly forbidden. This seems like a good way to stave off potential conflicts of interest, however with ubiquity having rendered these terms into (basically) general nouns, it might be difficult to find a vernacularly-fitting way around them.

...more