Posts Tagged: J. Robert Lennon

Notable Portland: 5/25–5/31

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Thursday 5/25: Claire Dederer reads from her latest memoir, Love and Trouble: A Midlife Reckoning. Powell’s City of Books, 7:30 p.m., free. Walt Gragg reads from his new book, The Red Line. Powell’s Books on Hawthorne, 7:30 p.m., free.

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Notable NYC: 5/6–5/12

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Saturday 5/6: Jennifer E. Smith presents Windfall. McNally Jackson Books, 6 p.m., free. Carmen Giménez Smith and Aldrin Valdez join the Segue Series. Zinc Bar, 4:30 p.m., $5.

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Scratch: Writers, Money, and the Art of Making a Living edited by Manjula Martin

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Today in Rumpus Books, Elizabeth Stark reviews Scratch: Writers, Money, and the Art of Making a Living, edited by Manjula Martin.

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The 200 Club

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Electric Literature’s Recommended Reading has put out its 200th issue, and to celebrate, they’re watching television. Or, thinking about watching television by revisiting the 200th episodes of classic sitcoms: J. Robert Lennon on The Cosby Show, Rob McCleary on The Love Boat, Morgan Parker on The Jeffersons, and Téa Obreht on Frasier.

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The Rumpus Interview with Jane Ciabattari and Grant Faulkner

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Jane Ciabattari, Vice President/Online of the National Book Critics Circle, and Grant Faulkner, NaNoWriMo director and 100 Word Story co-founder, talk flash fiction.

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Rumpus Video Premiere: The Size Queens’s To The Country

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An exclusive video premiere of The Size Queens’s To the Country, a two-song sampler featuring the titular track, “To The Country,” along with “Hands and Knees.”

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Something Short and Weird

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Electric Literature has announced the upcoming debut of its weekly online magazine Okey-Panky, a cocktail of short, experimental writing brewed to cure the Monday blues: Okey-Panky would be dedicated to brevity, eccentricity, and dark humor. It would publish every Monday morning, which is when you desperately need something short and weird. Head to okeypanky.com next […]

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Stop Reading New Fiction?

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It has a provocative headline (“Literary fiction is boring!”), but J. Robert Lennon’s Salon piece about what writers should read is not nearly as simplistic or sensationalist as you might expect. Whether you agree with his conclusions or not, he does make some good points. For example: But a fiction writer ought to engage with other […]

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