Posts Tagged: Japan

Album of the Week: Mellow Waves by Cornelius

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Cornelius is the alter ego of the legendary Japanese composer, producer, and multi-instrumentalist Keigo Oyamada.

Twenty years after releasing their iconic album Fantasma in 1997, and putting an end to an eleven-year-long silence, the Tokyo-based musician and his band are now back with Mellow Waves, out now via Rostrum Records.

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Lone Star Cinema

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In clinging to a set of memories that fade more every day, maybe I’m also clinging to an idyllic version of my own past. ...more

This Week in Indie Bookstores

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A Jordanian bookseller opened a 24-hour “Emergency Room for the Mind” that offers life-affirming literature.

One Seattle-area bookstore thinks to the key to success is more competition and is seeking out a neighboring bookstore to open nearby.

Bucharest, Romania is getting two new bookstores.

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Finishing What You Start: A Conversation with Musician Matt Kivel

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Matt Kivel discusses his latest release, Fires on the Plain, the ways in which cinema inspires his music, and how he reads his critics. ...more

Storytelling Is a Search: An Interview with Sequoia Nagamatsu

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Sequoia Nagamatsu discusses his debut collection Where We Go When All We Were Is Gone, grief as a character, and the intersection of ancient myth and the modern world. ...more

The Rumpus Interview With Danielle Trussoni

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Danielle Trussoni discusses her new memoir, The Fortress, black magic, the cult of marriage, and the dark side of storytelling. ...more

This Week in Indie Bookstores

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An eight-time Jeopardy! winner is turning the cash into his dream: a bookstore.

City Lights in San Francisco is offering up a special section featuring resistance literature.

Bookstores in Washington, DC supported the Women’s March and hosted events through inauguration weekend.

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This Week in Books: The Light on the Wall

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Welcome to This Week in Books, where we highlight books just released by small and independent presses. Books have always been a symbol for and means of spreading knowledge and wisdom, and they are an important part of our toolkit in fighting for social justice.

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This Week in Indie Bookstores

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Revolution Books in New York City’s Harlem neighborhood is exploiting Trump’s election to raise money for a fight against fascism.

People in Japan value neighborhood bookstores so much that local governments are opening government-run stores in an effort to keep community spaces flourishing.

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This Week in Indie Bookstores

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thisweekinindiebookstores

Just announced today: beloved Brooklyn bookstore BookCourt is closing after 35 years in business.

Independent booksellers were the focus of a panel at the Miami Book Fair—discussion focused on how big business was surprised that small business strategies could be useful in selling books.

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Home-Turned-Library Brings Japanese Literature to Community

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For the Los Angeles TimesKelly Corrigan spoke with Mitsuko Roberts of Glendale, California about The Okanoue Library, a collection of over 700 works of Japanese literature, film, and other media donated by Glendale’s Japanese community. Roberts hosts this collection a few times a month in her home-turned-library, lending out materials and offering Japanese reading classes.

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This Week in Indie Bookstores

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Chicago bookstores are worried about the arrival of a physical Amazon store.

One bookstore is using clickbait tactics on social media to trick people into reading more books.

Some people actually like airport bookstores.

A rural Virginia bookstore has become wildly successful.

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This Week in Indie Bookstores

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The World Bank houses a bookstore. Unfortunately, it’s closing.

Harry Potter is causing a legal dispute between two bookstores in the Philippines, with one store claiming a legal monopoly over the book.

CityLab checks out The Last Bookstore, a massive bookstore warehouse in Los Angeles.

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No Dancing, Please

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FACT‘s profile of rising electronic musician Seiho Hayakawa serves as an introduction to the unique challenges the underground music scene in Japan has had to contend with over the years:

While the internet and cheaper travel have helped break down many of the physical barriers that once isolated Japan, the way the music industry operates remains difficult to understand from afar.

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This Week in Indie Boosktores

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A charity bookstore in Swansea, Wales, had so many copies of Fifty Shades of Gray that the store built a fort.

A Georgia store needs a superhero after more than $200,000 worth of comic books were stolen.

One of the Hong Kong booksellers who disappeared last year amidst mainland China’s censorship sweep has vowed to quit the book trade.

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VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Desiree Cooper

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Desiree Cooper discusses her debut collection of flash fiction, Know the Mother, what mother-writers need, and why motherhood is the only story she’s ever told. ...more

The Slow Fall of the Hot Heroine

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If nothing else, it’s the opinion of other women that encroaches on mine. Resemblances spark my joy; differences become character flaws. ...more

I Hear the Place That Can’t Be Named

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It is remembering and loving anyway—not forgetting—that binds us even if the recollections are absurd, undignified, cruel, or humiliating. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Sanae Ishida

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Sanae Ishida discusses her debut children's book, Little Kunoichi, The Ninja Girl, embracing her creativity after years in the corporate world, and finding inspiration in her young daughter. ...more

The Japanese Toilet Takes a Bow: A Personal History

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I’ve long been afraid of toilets in Japan, beginning with the one in the temple we visited every summer starting in 1975, when my mother and I began to regularly go to her homeland in a bid to make sure I was familiar with her culture. ...more

This Week in Indie Bookstores

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Japanese bookseller Kinokuniya Co. plans on increasing the number of direct purchases made from publishers to avoid wholesalers’ markups. The store previously bought most of the stock of Murakami’s latest essay collection to compete against online sales.

Burlesque dancers danced outside a Barnes & Noble Bookstore on the Upper West Side of Manhattan after the store cancelled a performance booked months earlier to promote the release of Goddess of Love Incarnate: The Life of Stripteuse Lili St Cyr.

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