Posts Tagged: memoir

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Carmen Maria Machado

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Carmen Maria Machado discusses her debut story collection, Her Body and Other Parties, her favorite horror writers and movies, and writing the book(s) she's always wanted to read. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview #105: Miranda Pennington

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In between book launch events, Miranda Pennington found time to discuss her bibliomemoir and more. ...more

Reinventing Motherhood and Re-Dreaming Reality: Talking with Ariel Gore

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Ariel Gore discusses her new novel We Were Witches, why capitalism and the banking system are the real enemies, and finding the limits between memoir and fiction. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Faith Adiele

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Faith Adiele discusses what it means to be a good literary citizen, the importance of decolonizing travel writing, and how she wants to change the way Black stories are being told. ...more

The Logic of the Book: Talking with Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich

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Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich discusses The Fact of a Body: A Murder and a Memoir, the importance of narrative structure, and the difference between facts and stories. ...more

Finding the Finally: Alice Anderson Discusses Some Bright Morning, I’ll Fly Away

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Alice Anderson on her memoir, Some Bright Morning, I’ll Fly Away, drag, and motherhood. ...more

Empathy Is Cheap: A Conversation with Brandon Harris

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Brandon Harris discusses his memoir Making Rent in Bed-Stuy, gentrification in New York City and Brooklyn, the homogenization of American cities by corporate America, and whiteness of film culture. ...more

Conversations with Writers Braver Than Me: Jessica Berger Gross

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Jessica Berger Gross discusses her new memoir, Estranged: Leaving Family and Finding Home, walking away from her parents age of twenty-eight, and the importance of boundaries. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #91: Meghan Lamb

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Author Meghan Lamb‘s new novel, Silk Flowers (Birds of Lace, March 2017), is a book that cuts to the core of disturbance. In it, a woman is struck by an inexplicable and undiagnosable illness that renders her immobile and takes away her ability to speak.

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #90: Erika Carter

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Erika Carter’s debut novel Lucky You tells the story of three young women in their early twenties who leave their waitressing jobs in an Arkansas college town to embark on a year off grid in the Ozark Mountains. In a remote house, without a washing machine or cell phone reception, Ellie, Chloe, and Rachel grapple with questions of identity, purpose, and what it means to be human.

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Ten Minutes of Motherhood: A Conversation with Ariel Levy

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Ariel Levy on The Rules Do Not Apply, the illusion of control, and language’s inability to express grief. ...more

Grief Is Not Regret: May Cause Love by Kassi Underwood

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When women do not want a pregnancy, we may not experience the marvel and awe some claim are instant and “natural”—or, if we do, they are overshadowed by fear, and grief. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Amy Benson

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Our American obsession with the personal and individual has made us the tremendous resource consumers we are in the world. ...more

The “Reality” of Memoir: Delphine de Vigan’s Based on a True Story

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Memoirists are not transcriptionists of their pasts, recalling conversations verbatim. They are artists, whose job is to interpret the lived history through an artistic lens. ...more

Rumpus Exclusive: An Excerpt from Benjamin Taylor’s The Hue and Cry at Our House: A Year Remembered

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The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Gabrielle Bell

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Gabrielle Bell discusses her forthcoming graphic memoir, Everything Is Flammable, what it was like to mine her own life for subject matter, and how anxiety affects her work. ...more

Allowing a Female to Own Her Genius: Talking with Alana Massey

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Alana Massey discusses her debut collection, All the Lives I Want, the best piece of writing advice she's ever received, and acknowledging the work that women do. ...more

Blur, Cross, Pulverize, Confront, Remember: Talking with James Allen Hall

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James Allen Hall on I Liked You Better Before I Knew You So Well, unmaking boundaries, and book titles. ...more

On Making Wishes

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It is true that I’m talking to a photo, but I’m not crazy. Neither am I a durochka. Fools are oblivious, at least those from my childhood fairy tales. I, on the other hand, am perfectly aware of the problem. ...more

This Week in Essays

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For Lidia Yuknavitch, the personal is unavoidably political in this piece for Electric Literature.

At Catapult, David Frey writes with moving realness on what it is like to watch a parent age and transition into assisted living.

Jenessa Abrams looks at the nuances of mental illness and the damage of a word like “crazy” here at The Rumpus.

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Visiting Abandoned Places: A Conversation with Kristen Radtke

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Kristen Radtke discusses her illustrated memoir Imagine Wanting Only This, working with editors on graphic narratives, and visiting abandoned places. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #79: Kelcey Parker Ervick

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The woman whose face appears on the Czech five-hundred koruna doesn’t appear there without consequence. During the late 19th century, politically active Božena Němcová was an innovator of Czech literature. Twenty-first century writer Kelcey Parker Ervick continues Němcová’s legacy in her own fairy tale-like work: a biographical collage, The Bitter Life of Božena Němcová.

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This Week in Essays

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For the Guardian, Dina Nayeri explores the troubling expectation that immigrants should replace their identity with gratitude.

At New York magazine, Bahar Gholipour covers the fine points of dredging up personal history when writing memoir.

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This Week in Books: Generation Space: A Love Story

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Welcome to This Week in Books, where we highlight books just released by small and independent presses. Books have always been a symbol for and means of spreading knowledge and wisdom, and they are an important part of our toolkit in fighting for social justice.

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The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Melissa Febos

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Melissa Febos discusses her new book Abandon Me, choosing to be celibate for six months, letting go of our own mythologies, and the sexist reaction women receive when they write nonfiction. ...more

Interrogating the English Language with Safiya Sinclair

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To be forced to speak in the language of the colonist, the language of the oppressor, while also carrying within us the storm of Jamaican patois, we live under a constant hurricane of our doubleness. ...more

The Read Along: Neda Semnani

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I picked up The Odyssey because I wanted to read about wanders and refugees. A story about a man who takes a decade to get home and is on a quest for safety seemed like a good place to start. ...more