Posts Tagged: memoir

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The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Sarah Hepola

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Editor and writer Sarah Hepola talks about her new memoir Blackout, how gender affects alcoholism, writing about female friendships, and the writers who've influenced her. ...more

Live-Tweeting Grief

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“The challenge of memorializing doesn’t favor professionals,” writes Sean Minogue over at Full Stop. So, how are autobiographical narratives of loss by Karl Ove Knausgaard, Joan Didion, or Paul Auster different from therapeutic journaling? Minogue takes a look at how these authors express the everyday details of living after a loss, and how new forms of written self-expression, like Twitter, shifts the line between personal and public grieving.

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The Rumpus Interview with Sean Wilsey

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Sean Wilsey discusses his latest book of essays, More Curious, being David Foster Wallace’s neighbor, the healing power of the American road trip, and the difference between writing fiction and memoir. ...more

A Memoir in Pictures

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If a picture is worth a thousand words, Caroline Calloway’s new memoir is going to be extremely long. The England-based art history student has been writing a memoir through her Instagram account, mashing together photos, captions, conversations, and more. Unlike most Instagram feeds, Calloway does not post in real time.

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The Rumpus Interview with Kara Richardson Whitely

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Author Kara Richardson Whitely discusses her new memoir, Gorge: My Journey Up Kilimanjaro at 300 Pounds, surviving food addiction and the trauma of being molested, and what comes next. ...more

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Conversations with Literary Ex-Cons: Jack Gantos

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Jack Gantos discusses the sense of “delusional invincibility” he had in 1970s New York that led him to prison—and then on to a career as an award-winning children’s book author. ...more

Mystery Maven Memoirs

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In the wake of the destruction of precious cultural artifacts during the unrest in Iran and Syria, a quiet memoir from the queen of mystery, Agatha Christie, remembers the landscape and archeological legacy. The autobiographical Come, Tell Me How You Live never technically went out of print, but HarperCollins will re-release the book in time for Ms.

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The Rumpus Interview with Sarah Tomlinson

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Author Sarah Tomlinson talks about ghostwriting, her father and childhood, the tradition of confessional writing, and her new memoir, Good Girl. ...more

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Fresh Comics #2: Transmissions from Beirut

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What are the fundamental differences between telling your own story, telling the story of another, and telling your story about trying to understand someone else’s story?

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Five Things About Ashley Ford

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Blogger and writer Ashley Ford is profiled at the Indianapolis Star. She talks about her childhood in Indiana, writing a memoir, and more:

We’re never going to see eye-to-eye on what’s OK to write about. I’m not trying to embarrass or hurt anybody but telling my story is something I can’t compromise.

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The Rumpus Interview with Shulem Deen

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Shulem Deen talks about his memoir, All Who Go Do Not Return, his life as an ex-Hasidic author, divorce and parenting, and how painful he found it to be cast out from the religious sect he'd belonged to for over fifteen years. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with George Hodgman

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Editor and author George Hodgman talks about his new memoir, Bettyville, what makes for a good memoir, and returning to his hometown of Paris, Missouri from New York to take care of his aging mother. ...more

HowtoGrowUp_Michelle Tea_credit Lydia Daniller

Growing Up: The Rumpus Interview with Michelle Tea

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Michelle Tea discusses life in recovery, the meaning of family, motherhood, and her new memoir How to Grow Up. ...more

An “I” for an “I”

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For a growing number of essayists, memoirists, and other wielders of the unwieldy “I,” confessional has become an unwelcome label—an implicit accusation of excessive self-absorption, of writing not just about oneself but for oneself.

Over at the Atlantic, Leslie Jamison argues that personal writing isn’t always confessional or solipsistic writing.

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