Posts Tagged: Pakistan

Home Is Here

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There is no singular Muslim story, no definitive identity for the entire religion. [...] Here, four women discuss what it's like to be a minority in America in 2017, post-9/11 and post-Trump. ...more

All Writing Is Political: A Conversation with Mohsin Hamid

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Mohsin Hamid discusses his new novel, Exit West, hope in fiction as a form of resistance, the necessity of learning to accept social change, and how much America and Pakistan have come to resemble each other. ...more

The Storming Bohemian Punks the Muse #21: Not Yesterday’s Demonstrations

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1972: War was waging in Vietnam and kids were coming home in boxes. Hippes and yippies went clean for Gene McCarthy, but George McGovern won the democratic nomination. Tricky Dick Nixon was the one for the Republicans and the so-called Silent Majority.

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VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Abeer Hoque

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Abeer Hoque talks about coming of age in the predominantly white suburbs of Pittsburgh, rewriting her memoir manuscript ten times, and looking for poetry in prose. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: No Wound

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Maybe I can touch it and show it to you. If I convince you, we can call it real. And then perhaps it will be. ...more

This Week in Indie Bookstores

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Monkey’s Paw in Toronto sells random books from a biblio-mat machine.

A manhunt is on for a thief who stole two rare books in New York City.

The last bookstore in Peshawar, Pakistan is closing.

A Dallas, Texas bookstore is tricking people into buying books by making them sound like clickbait.

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This Week in Indie Bookstores

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To celebrate Small Business Saturday, President Obama shopped at Upshur Street Books in the Petworth neighborhood of Washington DC.

Magers & Quinn, an independent Minneapolis bookseller, has been open on Thanksgiving for the last thirteen years—mostly to provide employees without family in the area a place to be during the holiday.

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Why Muslims Felt Excluded in India

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Part of [Gandhi’s] genius was he was able to broaden out the appeal of the independence movement…But the way he did it was by using Hindu iconography and stories, mythology…He was personally very unprejudiced about this..But for Muslims, ordinary Muslims, who would see this and listen to these speeches and so forth, he seemed like a Hindu figure more than a national figure.

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The Voice of Secondary Trauma

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In his review of Bilal Tanweer’s The Scatter Here is Too Great, Jess Row writes about the trauma that’s influenced so many of Pakistan’s novelists:

Pakistan is a country where the fact of suffering is indeed irrefutable, whether we’re speaking of the horrific treatment of women and religious minorities, the use of terrorism — both insurgent and state-sponsored — as a tool of political strategy or simply the persistence of the most extreme poverty in a country that wastes billions on a state of perpetual war.

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The New York Comics and Picture-Story Symposium: Alexandra Atiya, Salman Toor, and Juliacks

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The New York Comics & Picture-Story Symposium is a weekly forum for discussing the tradition and future of text/image work. Open to the public, it meets Monday nights 7-9 p.m. EST in New York City.

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Ode to Malala

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Girls Write Now, an organization dedicated to offering creative opportunities to underserved and at-risk girls in New York City public high schools, just released a music video called “Ode to Malala.” The song is based on a poem written by one of the program’s participants, and honors Malala Yousafzai, the education activist from Pakistan who was shot walking home from school.

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“Firecrackers and Wedding Music”

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Granta has a stirring excerpt from Maria Choudhuri’s forthcoming memoir Beloved Strangers, about growing up in the capital of Bangladesh and then moving to New York.

The excerpt starts to explore the topic of her parents’ arranged marriage and what it meant for her mother to trade in a music career for a domestic life in a new town full of Pakistani soldiers.

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