Posts Tagged: Rape culture

Ready for Change: Discussing Sexual Assault with SafeBAE

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The co-founders of SafeBAE discuss the challenges and victories of teaching students about rape culture, consent, and anti-bullying. ...more

An Experience and a Life and a Family: Talking with Scaachi Koul

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Scaachi Koul on her debut essay collection One Day We'll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter, learning to be patient with her own narrative, and three rules for book tours. ...more

The Unbearable Whiteness of Being: Claudia Cortese Discusses Wasp Queen

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Poet Claudia Cortese talks about her new book Wasp Queen and Lucy, the rebellious 90s teen whose voice inspired the collection. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Tara Betts

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Tara Betts discusses her newest collection, Break the Habit, the burden placed on black women artists to be both artist and activist, and why writing is rooted in identity. ...more

Vigilantism and Orange is the New Black: The Anxiety of Injustice

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When those in power stifle the voices of survivors, they find other ways of expressing their truths. ...more

Sound & Vision: Alice Bag

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Allyson McCabe talks with Alice Bag, one of LA punk’s first frontwomen in the mid-70s as the lead singer and co-founder of the Bags, and who has just released her self-titled debut solo album. ...more

To Become Louder, Even Still

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We can’t change our community, and ourselves, if we don’t foster a dialogue about how power is abused within it, and the only way to do that is to empower survivors to speak.

Following recently forced awareness, Muriel Leung, editor of Apogee, collects fourteen responses from various writers to the sexual violence perpetrated in our literary community.

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The Rumpus Interview with Alida Nugent

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Alida Nugent talks about her new book You Don’t Have to Like Me: Essays on Growing Up, Speaking Out, and Finding Feminism, the messiness and realness of sex and sexuality, and putting likeability last. ...more

New Audiences, New Allies

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Can mansplaining ever be productive? Flavorwire’s Sarah Seltzer suggests that while Jon Krakauer’s ignorance may be infuriating, his “show don’t tell” approach to writing about rape in Missoula might help readers see firsthand how structures of oppression operate:

Krakauer isn’t speaking to “us.” He’s speaking to his mainstream audience, and many of them are probably as ignorant as he admits he was.

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The Real Problem with Campus Rape

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Fraternities do not have a monopoly on rapists: not at UVA, not at any frat, not even the deep Southern ones where upwards of 100 guys live in the house. (The plumbing; one shudders.) But: what the fraternity system does collect together is a group of male teenagers who enter their organization through rites of interpersonal physical violence, and who, military-style, reproduce this violence onto each other’s bodies.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, say hello to our new Saturday media editor, Arielle Bernstein!

Then, in “All The World’s A Stage,” Grant Snider neatly illustrates our inner performer.

Poet Kent Shaw marvels at the “glandular muscularity” of water as a theme in Harmony Holiday’s dual book, A Famous Blues/Go Find Your Father.

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The Rise and Fall of Alt Lit

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The Alt Lit community brought together a disparate group of writers and poets from the sorts of backgrounds often ignored by mainstream literary fiction, leveraging the Internet and building a loyal and dedicated following. Then this fall, allegations of a history of rape, sexual abuse, and misogyny within the community exploded across the Internet.

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The Rumpus Saturday Essay: Stain

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It’s hard to remember why I was silent. Maybe, like some of the women only now reporting they were raped by Bill Cosby decades ago, I was afraid I wouldn’t be believed. ...more

Rolling Stone: A Rumpus Roundup

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Last month, Rolling Stone ran an article by Sabrina Rubin Erdely detailing the gang-rape and attempted coverup of a student at the University of Virginia known as “Jackie.” .

Today, Rolling Stone issued an apology.

Editors at the magazine did not contact the men Jackie accused of rape.

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