Posts Tagged: romance

Mixed Feelings: Why Do Men Always Want to Settle Down?

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Many women do want to get married, and that’s a perfectly reasonable choice. The problem, then, is that when a woman says she doesn’t want to marry, many people find this hard to believe. ...more

Reading across Cultures: A Conversation with Ratika Kapur

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Ratika Kapur discusses her latest book, The Private Life of Mrs. Sharma, the disappointing romance of affairs, and how people carry on after doing the unthinkable. ...more

Writing Romance: The Rumpus Interview with Sonali Dev

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Sonali Dev talks about her latest novel, A Change of Heart, the romance genre, writing non-white characters, and the parallels between writing and architectural design. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Jane Alison

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Jane Alison discusses her autobiographical novel, Nine Island, the value of truth in fiction, and unsubscribing from romantic love. ...more

The Rumpus Review of Bridget Jones’s Baby

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Perhaps Bridget fans who watched the movies but never read the books might not find this movie to be such a hard blow... But those who read the books—and those who loved the pilgrim soul in Bridget—will feel the loss more keenly. ...more

The Rumpus Review of The Light Between Oceans

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I wanted so badly to invest in the characters, to cry and feel their pain, but I felt detached. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Maryse Meijer

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Maryse Meijer discusses her debut collection Heartbreaker, the importance of tension in writing, revision as a shield against criticism, and life as a twin. ...more

You’ve Got Mail and the Internet of Ordinary People

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You’ve Got Mail was one of the first movies to depict the Internet as it affects the lives of ordinary users. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Amy Rose Spiegel

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Amy Rose Spiegel discusses her debut memoir, Action: A Book about Sex, carnal confidence, and the nuances of sex-positivity. ...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: Swans and Other Lies

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As she presses against Patterson, she feels her feet softening, losing gravity. He’s embracing her, willing her to disappear, swallowing her. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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Valentine’s Day, the annual celebration of romance, named after a martyred saint who doesn’t have anything to do with love, is almost here. In recognition of the holiday, The Cut is providing a refreshing counterpoint to the flowers-and-chocolates narrative with “True Romance: five days of stories about love as it’s actually lived,” which includes a tale of loving a con artist, the story of a shotgun wedding, and a simultaneously depressing and uplifting account of romance after ten years of marriage (a highly recommended read).

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This Week in Short Fiction

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When you think of romance, you probably think Romeo and Juliet, Pride and Prejudice, Gone With the Wind, Wuthering Heights—or anything by Nicholas Sparks if you’re into more modern fare. These famous love stories, spread across centuries, have one thing in common: they’re all about heterosexual couples.

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The Last Book I Loved: Sheila Levine Is Dead and Living In New York

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But when my loneliness feels as vast—and capable of drowning me—as the sea, this book about self-destruction comforts me more than any self-help. ...more

Choice or Fate in Romance

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For Aeon, Polina Aronson writes on the different “romantic regimes” of the world, with “regime” defined as the cultural, economic, and sociological systems behind how we engage in relationships. Aronson compares the Western “Regime of Choice” with the regime in Russian culture that, until recently, bore little resemblance to one based on choice but rather on fate:

The most important requirement for choice is not the availability of multiple options.

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The Saturday Rumpus Review: Little Minnie at the Movies

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Being a teenager sucks. It’s not pretty or nice or sweet or kind. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Growing Up Gaming

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“Is this inclusive or exclusive?” he asked with a creased brow. “I don’t like the idea that we’re being treated as a joke.” ...more