Posts Tagged: spoken word

Making Sense of the World: A Conversation with Dessa

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Dessa discusses her recently released album, Chime, where she stands on the intersection of poetry and performance, and self-care for busy artists.

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Both Outsider and Participant: Thousand Star Hotel by Bao Phi

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In Thousand Star Hotel, the bilingual writer’s struggle with expressing himself in English becomes a metaphor for the immigrant’s struggle with navigating the host nation’s hostile-yet-lucrative social terrain.

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Vincent Toro: Challenging Whiteness and Refusing to Be Colonized

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Poet Vincent Toro on his debut collection, Stereo.Island.Mosaic, his writing process, and searching for identity.

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Poem of the Day: “Dope” by Amiri Baraka

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Amiri Baraka was a provocateur, a radical, an activist, and an amazing poet who remains relevant for all the wrong reasons and some of the right ones. “Dope” is an explosion, a satire, an investigation, an accusation, a poem that kills. His energy was and is unmatched, accomplishing even in recording a mesmerizing, enrapturing, anxiety-inducing […]

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Poetry Inspires Kids to Change the World

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To do spoken word, you need bodies, you need people, you need that sense of gathering. Poets have always tapped into an unspoken understanding that language can tap into the ways in which the world works. Over at the Huffington Post, Daveed Digs and Danez Smith discuss how poetry equips children with a sense of voice that inspires them […]

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Listening to Poets

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Should poetry be heard and not seen? In most, though not all, historic literary traditions, verse is distinguished from prose by the fact that the lines or stanzas are identified as such by recurrent patterns of sound (quantity, accent, rhyme, or assonance) which are independent of both the syntax and the meaning. This strict definition […]

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People Talk

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In a new history of the evolution of language, Matthew Battles focuses on humans’ relationship with writing. For Slate, John H. McWhorter argues that Battles’s distinction between the written and spoken word misunderstands how we use the Internet: Much of the “collective, aphoristic” writing Battles describes would today be termed tweets and posts.

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