Posts Tagged: stereotypes

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The Rumpus Interview with Garrard Conley

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Garrard Conley, author of the new memoir Boy Erased, discusses growing up in the deep South, mothers, writing for change, and political delusions. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Kamden Hilliard

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Survival is not always cute, politically responsible, mature, or sober. Survival is ramshackle, as is tolerance. ...more

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The Rumpus Review of Mustang: Five French Girls Walk into an Anatolian Village

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The Case for Including More Female Scientists in Literature

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If female characters are restricted to the roles of artist, dancer, waitress, or barista, their potential to generate fiction that explores existentially rich and original worlds also seems restricted.

In the ongoing discussion of groups in sore need of better representation in today’s storytelling, Eileen Pollack urges writers to consider writing about female scientists in fiction.

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Are You the Woman Reader?

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It’s not that the books that get someone into the “serious reader” club are all or even mostly by men these days. But the books that get you kicked out of the club are almost exclusively written by women.

Hannah Engler writes for Book Riot on “women’s literature” and the still-unevolved stereotype of the Woman Reader.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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As the stump speeches and primary dates continue to roll on and thousands of Americans develop stress ulcers, Darcey Steinke delivers a humorous and terrifying vision of our dystopian future should Donald Trump win the presidential election. “The Blue Toes,” over at Catapult, features a distinctly Trump-like figure called “the Tomato” and his followers, the eponymous “Blue Toes,” who rise up after the polls are called and flock to New York City to oust the liberals:

The livestream camera fixed on the side of the road showed the Blue Toes moving thick and fast.

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The Slow Fall of the Hot Heroine

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If nothing else, it’s the opinion of other women that encroaches on mine. Resemblances spark my joy; differences become character flaws. ...more

John’s Pixie Dream Girls

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Mary Jo Tewes Cramb discusses the perpetuation of the “manic pixie dream girl” stereotype in John Green’s novels:

In Green’s novels, there is considerable tension between the potent appeal of his manic pixie characters, the excitement and fun they bring into the narrators’ lives, and the messages these characters impart about their own lives and identities.

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The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Jennifer Baker

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The more variation we see in life, the more it becomes less about seeing one type of book by marginalized people. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with J. Ryan Stradal

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J. Ryan Stradal talks about his debut novel Kitchens of the Great Midwest and why the rise of the American foodie has less to do with hipsters than you might think. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Bill Cosby’s Faux Legacy

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Bill Cosby was never the man, the icon, the protector and illustrator of black culture, the guide, the genius we have created in our minds. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Stepfatherhood

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“He was my real dad,” she says. “I just happened to have two.” ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Tamara Winfrey-Harris

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The reality is that there is privilege even within social justice movements. ...more

UK Publishing is Racist, Too

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The Writing the Future report . . . found that the “best chance of publication” for a black, Asian or minority ethnic (BAME) writer was to write literary fiction conforming to a stereotypical view of their communities, addressing topics such as “racism, colonialism or post-colonialism as if these were the primary concerns of all BAME people.”

On the heels of the depressing statistics of the first-ever Women of Color VIDA Count, the UK’s Writing the Future report reveals that things aren’t any better for writers of color across the pond.

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