Posts Tagged: the believer

No Time To Be Neurotic

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The Believer has just published what is likely writer Peter Matthiessen’s last interview, conducted only a month before his death. Included: Jaws, the sticker that Kurt Vonnegut left on Matthiessen’s car, and why Matthiessen didn’t like to write about New York:

I also very rarely write about cities or urban people—especially urban people of our own region.

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A Month Forever Voyaging

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Mike Mills—the director of Beginners, Thumbsucker, and any number of fluorescent music videos—speaks to The Believer about his upcoming film. On their monthly podcast, The Organist, Mills discusses A Month Forever Voyaging through Strange Seas of Thought, what it felt like to direct youths so entirely enmeshed with technology, and the politics of being an Apple engineer’s daughter.

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Ashley Farmer Release Party in SF

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If you live in the Bay Area, you owe it to yourself to make it out to this release party for Ashley Farmer’s book Beside Myself, out from our essays editor Roxane Gay‘s own Tiny Hardcore Press.

THP—and its associated litmag, PANK—are celebrating the new title at the Make-Out Room in San Francisco, where they’ll be joined by our friends at the Believer. Readers will include Daniel Levin Becker, Rumpus contributors Ethel Rohan and Sarah Marshall, and Rumpus pal Matthew Zapruder.

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“A Fight Against the Language That’s Been Fucked Up”

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Before this government, usually you would find people in the buses with their books and with their newspapers, now you can’t see that. When I read in the bus now, I become like an alien. People start looking at you…‘He’s reading. What is he reading?’

For the Believer‘s blog, Nafeesa Syeed interviews Mamoun Eltlib, a young Sudanese writer struggling to uplift his country’s culture, despite various forms of government repression.

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Retrospective: Nancy vs. Tonya

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This month in The Believer, Sarah Marshall takes a look back at figure skating in the 90’s. Particularly the stifled rivalry between US ice princesses Tonya Harding and Nancy Kerrigan. Marshall’s perspective is not unique but it’s beautifully thorough. She examines the figure skating business like a true heart-broken fan – yearning for Kerrigan’s lost reparations yet also grieving a sport that has thrown away its potential to empower its skaters both socially and politically.

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“Write What You Feel Like Writing”

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For the Believer, Lane Koivu interviews our fearless leader Stephen Elliott about, among other things, “the thrill of finding himself in the director’s chair, the time he nearly got locked up by a psychiatrist in San Francisco, and why he’s always in a race against his own enthusiasm.”

Here’s a little morsel of their wide-ranging and compelling conversation:

It’s not like I let everybody on set rewrite the script.

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Searching for Dave Chappelle

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“To turn his back on Hollywood, to walk away from the spotlight because it was turning him into a man he didn’t want to be—a man without dignity—was a move that was, in a way, Chappelle’s birthright, his own unwieldy kind of Negritude.”

Featured in this month’s Believer is Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah’s essay on the 10-year anniversary of Dave Chappelle’s departure from his self-titled show.

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TV Can Be Literature Too

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Long-running, writer-driven shows have overtaken American cinema as the most prestigious strand of American visual culture, revealing most of even the supposedly best American movies as risk-averse, unimaginative, and hopelessly bound by their time constraints.

Todd Hasak-Lowy argues on the Believer‘s blog that despite TV’s bad rep among literary types, there is Good TV that reaches the level of Literature (caps his).

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Ali Liebegott and Dorianne Laux at The Believer

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In honor of National Poetry Month, please check out poet Ali Liebegott’s wonderfully conducted interview with the eminent Dorianne Laux, where Laux sheds light on Emily Dickinson and Edna St. Vincent Millay for helping her hone her poetic craft.

 If I hadn’t been able to talk with myself, with respect, as a whole human being, who had a mind and heart and desires, a goodness, a desire to be good—you know, all of those things, I think, are the original impulse when we sit down and write. I’m not the only person in the world who is suffering.

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Keep Doubt Alive with Essays

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If you’re a regular Rumpus reader, you probably like essays. And if you like essays, you’ll probably enjoy this New York Times opinion piece about their literary and social value:

Ever since Michel de Montaigne, the founder of the modern essay, gave as a motto his befuddled “What do I know?” and put forth a vision of humanity as mentally wavering and inconstant, the essay has become a meadow inviting contradiction, paradox, irresolution, and self-doubt.

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Believer Week

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Subscriptions to The Believer are $5 off all week long in celebration of their upcoming 2012 music issue.

The issue features a free cassette tape (and digital download) curated by Calvin Johnson, and interviews with Lucinda Williams, Mobe, Brian Chippendale, and Wes Borland.

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No Comment

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At the Believer, Meghan Daum dissects the “commenting culture” of the Internet and the rampant “haterade” in our public discourse.

“A young person (any person) who published a piece as incendiary as “Safe-Sex Lies” today would be chewed up and spit out so many times over by bloggers and commenters and cable-news screamers that the idea of “understanding what I was trying to get across” would seem not just quaint but moot.”

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