Posts Tagged: The Boston Review

Walk-In Closets

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We seem to find ourselves, as writers, standing amidst the last century’s discarded tropes of sexual identity. Recently, writers of all sexual permutations have been recycling this narrative architecture; reworking its stones and walls and windows; borrowing and transforming the old, four-square structures of identity into Gehry-like fantasias, curves, and spires. In the Boston Review, Stacey […]

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The Body and the Disembodied

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Little sleeve, Is this really what we call saving? Across an ocean drones are banqueting as bees as bombs in bridal arrangements & we call this progress. The satellites are monitoring our devolving.  Little sleeve, How does love appear in no gravity? Like love, like love. The Boston Review recently shared poems from their 2016 Poetry Contest […]

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The Joy of Poetry

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For the Boston Review, Jericho Brown shares why he identifies with poetry and what it means to find “joy” in the writing process: I love writing because it is the moment at which I am at once both completely present (paying close attention to my own thinking) and completely absent (as the language for that thinking flows […]

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Female Friendships and Online Literary Sexism

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As an essayist who often writes from personal experience and who’s working on a memoir, I believe deeply it is a feminist act for women to tell their stories.

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The Treasures in Union Square

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If you are among those who fantasize about secret messages in the public world—love letters in Burger King wrappers and Narnia entrances in gym lockers—then geocaching, or at least an essay about geocaching, might be just for you. Matthew Fishbane writes in The Boston Review on the ways that geogaching makes him see things he otherwise might […]

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“Not since Sylvia Plath…

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…has a poet indulged an orgy of self-speculation of these proportions.” At The Boston Review, B.K. Fischer takes a close look at Rumpus contributor Ariana Reines’ poetry of the erotic sublime, focusing on her two recent collections, Cœur de Lion and Mercury. Fischer draws out Reines’ recurring exploration of the “fundamental sources” of grief, and […]

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