Posts Tagged: the daily beast

This Week in Posivibes: Don’t Call it a Comeback

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Though after a short year-long reunion (and a 48-year history), we’re officially losing Pink Floyd, this summer has been overrun with bands getting back together! Gregg Allman was joined on stage by Jaimoe and Warren Haynes at Peach Fest, and has recently said there is potential for a full Allman Brothers reunion. 

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George Plimpton: Paris Review Founder, Fireworks Connoisseur

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At The Daily Beast, Anthony Haden-Guest reminisces about the annual Fourth of July party thrown by George Plimpton, founder and editor of the Paris Review.

Not only did Plimpton throw the biggest and best fireworks parties in the Hamptons, he requested that his ashes be packed into a firework upon his death.

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Trigger Warning

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Neil Gaiman talks with The Daily Beast about his new story collection, Trigger Warning, why he chose the controversial title, and why he’s become obsessed with the conversation around trigger warnings:

It seemed to me that so much of it was about content, about where do we stand on fiction and stories that upset you deeply, and go further, that send you into a breath-clutching, heart beating faster, messed-up person plunged into your bath because of something you’ve read in a story.

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Lost in Translation

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Three Percent, a resource for international literature at the University of Rochester, derives its name from the fact that about 3 percent of all the books published in the U.S. every year are translations. But the bulk of these are technical writings or reprints of literary classics; only 0.7 percent are first-time translations of fiction and poetry.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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On Tuesday, Guernica published “Walking on Water,” an excerpt from Payem Faeli’s 2010 novella, I Will Grow, I Will Bear Fruit… Figs. In this excerpt, translated into English by Sarah Khalili, Faeli provides a meditative taste of the novella’s wandering narrator, a young boy in search of a name.

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Straight Outta Gotham

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On August 18, hip-hop and comic book nerds alike convened to celebrate the release of Volume 2 of Ed Piskor’s The Hip-Hop Family Tree, a history of the genre in graphic novel-form. In the Daily Beast, Daniel Genis explains how the competing personae and one-upsmanship among rappers translate so easily to a medium that often depicts superhero fights.

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The Dish Ran Away With the Andrew Sullivan Readers

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Andrew Sullivan is lighting out on his own, hoping his blog The Dish will make enough money to stay afloat without the assistance of the Daily Beast or any other publication.

His plan has a number of details that set it apart from other attempts to monetize online media: no ads (for now), no paywall (sort of), and an option for dedicated fans to pay over and above the annual subscription price, to name a few.

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How Books Clubs Went Indie

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“Forty-something Betsy Birdsall jokes that she likes the Rumpus group because it enables her to hang out in her bathrobe and slippers while pretending she has friends. She says Elliot encouraged her to get active with the club’s discussion group. ‘This is the first online community I’ve been a part of,’ Birdsall, a paralegal from Agoura, California, said.

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Bright Lights, Big City and “The Shattering of the Self”

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“…Jay McInerney’s 1984 publication of Bright Lights allows us excavation to an even earlier level of American self-confusion. The novel’s second-person narrative, which people found so powerfully affecting, cannot be dismissed as but a clever trick when seen in a broader context—as a visceral reaction to the early stage of a society where Don DeLillo’s J.

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