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Posts Tagged: The Paris Review

Alas, Poor Transatlantic Review!

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The Paris Review just celebrated its sixtieth birthday—and not a gray hair in sight!

But many game-changing, sterling-quality literary magazines didn’t make it to that ripe old(ish) age.

At Flavorwire, Jason Diamond rounds up some of the Paris Review‘s most promising peers and their untimely deaths.

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Backcountry Childhoods

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Memory forms, piece by piece. Some of them go missing, others interlock, firm. We fill in the missing pieces with what we imagine or just leave the gap, admit the blank. And sometimes, we imagine what might have been, would have been.

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Drop Whatever You’re Doing and Read This Toni Morrison Interview

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In 1993, an interview with Toni Morrison appeared in The Paris Review—and it feels just as relevant and immediate twenty years later.

Morrison covers vast ground: what makes a good editor, how white writers get black characters wrong (or right), the importance of teaching undergraduate students, and a million other marvelous things.

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Words of Our Lives

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“The main thing about something gruckimish is that gruck (the noun form) is always the unintended byproduct of the creator’s intention. Things that are supposed to be funny are rarely gruckimish. On the other hand, to call something gruckimish is never a value judgment: it is a simple statement of fact.”

At The Paris Review, Sadie Stein explains (and illustrates) gruckimish—a word that she and her best friend invented at age four and have employed ever since.

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Cendrars, The Extraordinary Daydreamer

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Long before David Shields excoriated the strict boundaries between journalism and fiction, espousing, in its place, a loose and open-ended hybrid that is more in keeping with “reality”, a Swiss-born Frenchman with one arm, a Gauloises cigarette forever dangling from his grizzled lips and a swaggering nonchalance befitting only a soldier and a drifter, penned a series of “autobiographies” that blended history, memoir, fiction, poetry, gossip, news clippings and every kind of slipshod arcana into one boisterous melange.

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Notable New York, This Week 6/21 – 6/27

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This week in New York Bret Easton Ellis and Shane Jones read, Light Industry screens “arty porn,” the musical Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson is in its final run at the Public Theater, The Fiery Furnaces and The New Bomb Turks perform, Behind the Scenes at The Paris Review releases its summer issue with a party, NYC Pride March, and Flavorpill hosts the largest yoga event ever on the Great Lawn at Central Park.

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The Paris Review Goes Southern

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It’s “Terry Southern Month” at The Paris Review Daily—the quarterly’s online “culture gazette,” the goal of which is to stay in touch with The Paris Review’s audience between print issues. Today, read an interview with Terry Southern from Issue 138.

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Should Dave Eggers Edit The Paris Review?

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“Whimsical, highly aestheticized, conspicuously casual, reverent of childhood and its signifiers, bound by the dialectic of irony and sincerity, the style of McSweeney’s has become the style of post-post-Modernism.

“It is No One Belongs Here More Than You and Everything Here Is The Best Thing Ever, yes, but also American Apparel and Avenue Q, the films of Michel Gondry and the career of Michael Cera.

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Literary Fashionables: The Cultural Theorist and The Sportsman

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Two hallowed New York intellectuals are The Rumpus’s next set of Literary Fashionables.  Susan Sontag and George Plimpton both circled the upper tiers of Manhattan’s literary society. And while exhibiting seemingly opposing aesthetics, both Sontag and Plimpton promulgated revolutionary ideas and modes of approach to writing that would impact literary stylists for years to come.

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