Posts Tagged: The Paris Review

This Week in Short Fiction

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On Tuesday, Guernica published “Walking on Water,” an excerpt from Payem Faeli’s 2010 novella, I Will Grow, I Will Bear Fruit… Figs. In this excerpt, translated into English by Sarah Khalili, Faeli provides a meditative taste of the novella’s wandering narrator, a young boy in search of a name.

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What Happens When You Never Talk About Religion

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In an interview with Jonathan Lee at The Paris Review, Joshua Ferris addresses why his new novel, To Rise Again at a Decent Hour, “starts from the question of whether there’s a kind of private language and intimacy to religion that the mutt-y white guys like [him] are missing out on.” More personally, he worries, too, if “as a writer there’s something [he] missed out on” not growing up with a religious sensibility:

… religion offers a writer a tradition both to be nurtured in and to fight against, and that nurturing and that conflict can produce great literature.

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Alas, Poor Transatlantic Review!

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The Paris Review just celebrated its sixtieth birthday—and not a gray hair in sight!

But many game-changing, sterling-quality literary magazines didn’t make it to that ripe old(ish) age.

At Flavorwire, Jason Diamond rounds up some of the Paris Review‘s most promising peers and their untimely deaths.

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Backcountry Childhoods

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Memory forms, piece by piece. Some of them go missing, others interlock, firm. We fill in the missing pieces with what we imagine or just leave the gap, admit the blank. And sometimes, we imagine what might have been, would have been.

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Drop Whatever You’re Doing and Read This Toni Morrison Interview

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In 1993, an interview with Toni Morrison appeared in The Paris Review—and it feels just as relevant and immediate twenty years later.

Morrison covers vast ground: what makes a good editor, how white writers get black characters wrong (or right), the importance of teaching undergraduate students, and a million other marvelous things.

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Words of Our Lives

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“The main thing about something gruckimish is that gruck (the noun form) is always the unintended byproduct of the creator’s intention. Things that are supposed to be funny are rarely gruckimish. On the other hand, to call something gruckimish is never a value judgment: it is a simple statement of fact.”

At The Paris Review, Sadie Stein explains (and illustrates) gruckimish—a word that she and her best friend invented at age four and have employed ever since.

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