Posts Tagged: translation

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The Rumpus Interview with Garth Greenwell

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Garth Greenwell discusses his debut novel, What Belongs to You, crossing boundaries, language as defense, and the queer tradition of novel writing that blurs boundaries between fiction and essay and autobiography. ...more

Translating Kafka into Japanese

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The Berlin-based author Yoko Tawada recently remarked that one of the difficulties she faced when translating Kafka’s short story “Metamorphosis” into Japanese was that the associations Japanese people had with insects—even presumably giant beetles—were different to those of Europeans.

In the Japan Times, Damian Flanagan traces the difficulties of translating “insect literature.”

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Immortalizing History

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Literature continually reminds us that we are not alone and (to paraphrase Kundera) that things are not always as simple as they seem. With so many stories, histories, characters and figures populating a reader’s mind, it’s easy for us to take for granted the liberation that literature imparts.

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The Brilliant Translator

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Over at Guernica, Katrina Dodson interviews Ann Goldstein, Elena Ferrante’s translator, about the mysterious Italian writer, the final Neapolitan novel, and the meaning of life:

Whether you’re a writer or not, you can imagine looking at your life and thinking, “What have I done?” What she’s doing in these books is asking, “What does my life mean?” She’s using that concrete image of being a writer and having a friendship, but she’s investigating the meaning of life.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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On Tuesday, London-based journal The White Review dropped its third annual translation issue, which features a truly global range of voices from Israel to Indonesia, South Africa to Russia. Among them is a fascinating new story by Bolivian writer Liliana Colanzi, translated by Frances Riddle.

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The Saturday Rumpus Review: Star Wars: The Force Awakens

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However, it’s taken me too long to say: The Force Awakens really is a fun and breathtaking movie ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Sandra and Ben Doller

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Sandra and Ben Doller talk about The Yesterday Project, a blind collaboration, and about what it means to savor each day when you have stage III melanoma. ...more

Amazon Dedicates $10 Million to Translations

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AmazonCrossing, the Amazon.com publishing arm that deals with works translated into English, will dedicate $10 million to expand its efforts over the next five years. This move will most likely position the publisher as the largest of translations in the US:

Even without exact numbers, there is more than enough evidence to suggest that AmazonCrossing has found a level of success.

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You Don’t Mess with Shakespeare

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Shakespeare is about the intoxicating richness of the language… It’s like the beer I drink. I drink 8.2 per cent I.P.A., and by changing the language in this modernizing way, it’s basically shifting to Bud Light. Bud Light’s acceptable, but it just doesn’t pack the punch and the excitement and the intoxicating quality of that language.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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This week brings us two stories in translation. First, “Six Days in Glorious Vienna,” at Hobart, is a quiet story with a punch. By Japanese author Yoko Ogawa and translated by Stephen Snyder, the story is part of the anthology A Kind of Compass: Stories on Distance, released on Thursday by Irish publisher Tramp Press.

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Can’t Read Italian? Ask Mom To Translate

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After reading the first two books in Elena Ferrante’s Neapolitan series, Sara Goldsmith enlisted her mother to translate the third book from Italian so that she didn’t have to wait another year for the English release. Now, for Slate, Goldsmith shares how the experience generated a new respect for the scope and craft of Ferrante’s novels, as well as how the project influenced her relationship with her mother:

For my mom and me—who, like all mothers and daughters, sometimes have a difficult relationship—the novels have given us a way to stay in closer touch and a subject to return to and discuss.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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This week, two underappreciated masters of the weird and uncanny are finally getting their due attention. That’s right, we’re talking about Clarice Lispector and Shirley Jackson, two literary powerhouses who wrote contemporaneously in different styles, different languages, even different hemispheres, but who have some striking similarities.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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Revise your summer reading lists, ladies and gentlemen, because this week brought us new issues of Guernica and Asymptote to bump to the top of the pile. Asymptote delivers more of its consistently stunning literature in translation, including a haunting story from the late Uruguayan author Mario Levrero about a very, very strange house. 

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The Rumpus Interview with Neil Smith

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Author Neil Smith discusses his latest book, Boo, the suffering inherent in being thirteen years old, and how friendship can help pull us through traumatic events in our lives. ...more