Posts Tagged: Vietnam

Womanly Arts

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This is the hearth. This is the knot. This is home. The woman bent over a sewing machine, the steady hum of the motor, the needle rising and sinking. ...more

This Week in Books: The Light on the Wall

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Welcome to This Week in Books, where we highlight books just released by small and independent presses. Books have always been a symbol for and means of spreading knowledge and wisdom, and they are an important part of our toolkit in fighting for social justice.

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #64: Lianne Stokes

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Hi there! We’re the two brunettes who hate sex. Sara-Kate hates sex because it’s too aerobic—she once sprained her foot. She lives in Kips Bay, loves candy, and wears exclusively rompers. Elisa Jordana hates sex because she abhors the human penis and all its functions.

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The Rumpus Interview with Terry McDonell

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Terry McDonell talks about his new memoir The Accidental Life and his career in the magazine business, which spans the beginning of New Journalism through the digital revolution. ...more

David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: 21 Poems That Shaped America (Pt. 7): “Facing It”

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There should be no forgetting, much less forgiveness, of what happened during the Vietnam War. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #58: James Steven Sadwith

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A self-described “actor’s director,” James Steven Sadwith has been writing, directing, and producing television movies, miniseries, and dramas for nearly three decades—and is perhaps best known for his work on the lives of Frank Sinatra and Elvis. But for Coming through the Rye, his first feature film for the big screen, Sadwith comes closer to home, chronicling in fictional form the journey he himself embarked upon as a youth.

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Wanted/Needed/Loved #12: Thao Nguyen’s Release

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The thing I want to talk about is something I’m not in possession of anymore, but of all the things I’ve lost it’s the thing I think about the most. ...more

Podcatcher #4: Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

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Jonathan Van Ness discusses his podcast, Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness, fierceness, curiosity, and hairstyles. ...more

The Last Book I Loved: Abbott Awaits

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Summer works like this. Every day small moments cycle like waves within tides, eroding our opportunities on a geological scale invisible from our point of immersion. ...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: Rhino Girl

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But these were not men, she realized. They were a cackle of spotted hyena, bright-toothed in the dark, and they were laughing at her. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Brendan Jones

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Brendan Jones talks about his debut novel, The Alaskan Laundry, living in Alaska, his time as a Wallace Stegner Fellow, and living and loving what you write. ...more

The Conversation: Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib and Paul Tran

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The sitting down to write, convincing myself that my voice matters, even though there are so many telling me that it doesn’t. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Anthony Marra

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Anthony Marra discusses his latest book, The Tsar of Love and Techno, how humor affects literature, how absurdity affects war, and what makes the perfect mixtape. ...more

War Narratives #4: Meet the Civilians

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Each character achieves independence in his own way, but independence winds up looking a lot like loneliness. ...more

This Week in Indie Bookstores

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Tokyo’s Morioka Shoten stocks just one book. Shop owner Yoshiyuki Morioka selects a single book each week to sell in his austere boutique.

A new non-profit bookstore in Istanbul, Turkey seeks to focus on Arab culture and the refugee experience as a response to the increasing number of Syrian intellectuals migrating to the city.

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The Rumpus Interview with Viet Thanh Nguyen

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Author Viet Thanh Nguyen discusses his debut novel, The Sympathizer, new ways of looking at the Vietnam War, and how to blend important ideas with entertainment. ...more

The Post-Apocalyptic Present

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For a smart writer, a ravaged future world also offers something like a perfect literary playground, a cleared field where everything from language to human psychology to social convention can be reconsidered and reframed, critiqued or reimagined.

The Millions reviews Quan Barry’s She Weeps Each Time You’re Born and looks at how it finds the post-apocalyptic future in the present of Vietnam.

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The Long History of “Matterhorn”

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“But for more than thirty years, the manuscript languished in literary purgatory, while the author struggled to find an agent—not to mention a publisher—willing to take it on.

Published in April as a collaboration between the California-based small press El León Literary Arts and Grove/Atlantic, the book—at nearly 650 pages, including a glossary—owes its existence to people in disparate pockets of the publishing industry, as well as to the extraordinary persistence of its sixty-five-year-old author.”

The new Poets And Writers is out and features a profile of Karl Marlante’s recent novel, Matterhorn, a Vietnam  novel that took him half his life to get published.

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