Monthly Archives:: November 2015

City and Sustenance

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At Hazlitt, novelist Orhan Pamuk discusses the influence of food and food vendors on his latest work, the ritual of drinking boza, and the inspiration that the city of Istanbul provides: I walk in the city all the time. It’s not because of research; it’s a lifestyle. I like it. I belong to that city […]

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Saudi Arabia to Execute Poet

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Saudi Arabia, an American ally, sentenced a poet to death for renouncing Islam, although it may have been retribution for posting online a video of police lashing a man in the street. Poets around the world criticized the execution. One Twitter user even compared Saudi Arabia to ISIS. Now the kingdom plans to sue that […]

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Brandon Hicks allows us a peek into psychological disorders of the animal kingdom, the most elite bars in the world, and more in “Just Some Jokes.” Then, in the Saturday Interview, our own Arielle Bernstein talks with blogger Josie Pickens about identity, gender, race, and class politics. The “uplifting” influence of readers on social media provides […]

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The Paradox of Growth As Good

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Martin Kirk writes for Aeon on the paradoxical connection between economic growth and eliminating poverty. Kirk illustrates that increasing the size of the economic pie, by spending the world’s finite resources, with no change in distribution to impoverished populations, will not only not eradicate poverty in the near future, but will only accelerate the depletion […]

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Dan Weiss’s Morning Coffee

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Of particular note these days: the Statue of Liberty was originally a Muslim woman. We have now witnessed a black hole burping back up a bit of star. Way to go everyone! A short history of dinosaurs in science fiction. But seriously, what is up with all these blue tarantulas? And now the magnificent bears […]

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The Rumpus Interview with William Gibson

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Legendary technomodernist William Gibson, author of Neuromancer, talks about his latest book, The Peripheral, predicting the future, and how writing about Silicon Valley today feels like his early work.

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Notable NYC: 11/28–12/4

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Monday 11/30: Simon Van Booy presents his story collection Tales of Accidental Genius. WORD Brooklyn, 7 p.m., free. Matt Hart and Darcie Dennigan join the Monday Night Poetry series. KGB Bar, 7 p.m., free. Molly Crabapple launches Drawing Blood with Matt Taibbi. Powerhouse Arena, 7 p.m., free. Richard Foreman, Ken Jacobs, and George Hunka celebrate […]

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The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Josie Pickens

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Josie Pickens talks about building relationships through blogging, changing the narrative around black women in America, and eradicating silence through storytelling.

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Notable Chicago: 11/27–12/3

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Sunday 11/29: June Huitt and Nicole Hollander share stories for Sideswiping Normal. $15 at Martyrs’, 3 p.m. Tuesday 12/1: First of the month? deadline. Back to Print hosts the release and open mic at Uncharted Books, 7 p.m. Tuesday Funk-y! This month’s featured readers: Clayton Smith, Gint Aras, James Gordon, Bill Savage, and Britt Julious. […]

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Notable Portland: 11/26–12/2

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Friday 11/27: A new free pop-up art school is coming to Portland. home school provides welcoming contexts for critical engagement with contemporary art and its issues. The launch will feature an exhibition of visual works by Victoria Reis, Taj Bourgeois, and poet manuel arturo abreu, who will also provide an amotivational speech. There will be […]

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Another Lost Work by a Dead Writer

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If it seems that “lost” books, short stories, and everything else are coming out of the woodwork, well, they are. The Strand magazine has just published Twixt Cup and Lip, an early play by William Faulkner written in the 1920s: The Strand describes the play as “a light-hearted jazz age story.” Prohibition is under way, and […]

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Literary Iceland

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Like the glaciers that cover much of the country, Iceland is covered with thick layers of stories. And like the volcanoes that roil beneath that icy crust, more stories are forming, ready to create a new geography. The New York Times travel section featured an article about Iceland’s culture of storytelling, Reykjavik’s literary scene, and […]

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“Hello”: An Adele News Roundup

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Since the release of 25, Adele has—unsurprisingly—dominated music news. The singer has been breaking records all month. First her single “Hello” smashed record views on Youtube and, at release, the album sold over 900,000 copies on iTunes in its first day, and 2.5 million in its first week. Billboard projects the sales of 25 to […]

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Fanfiction Can Be Literary Too

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For Book Riot, Vanessa Willoughby explores the benefits of writing fan fiction, and how notable works are often imitations of timeless stories: Literature that is unforgettable incites a dialogue at the very least, and a conversation at its best. Novels can serve as responses to pre-existing literature. Some of the best pieces of literature are works […]

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Anna March’s Reading Mixtape #11: Thanksgiving Is Racist as Hell

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It’s long past time to explode some myths about Indigenous Peoples, whites and Thanksgiving. For many of us in the US, Thanksgiving has become a day to reunite with friends and family, watch football and gorge ourselves on an enormous feast. Giving thanks has taken a back seat and the truth about the massacres and […]

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Notable San Francisco: 11/25–12/1

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Thanksgiving week is a slow time for notable events, but what we’ve got is as good as pecan pie! Happy holiday! Wednesday 11/25: Lunada Literary Lounge, the monthly full moon bi-lingual reading and open mic at Galeria de la Raza in the Mission District presents poet Suzana Huerta and harpist María José Montijo plus ten five minute […]

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