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Posts by: Jeremy Hatch

Autosummarize, Applied to Popular Works

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Graphic designer Jason Huff has taken the 100 most-downloaded copyright-free books and applied Microsoft Word’s 10-sentence autosummary to them. The Book Bench highlights some funny ones, but it’s really worthwhile downloading Huff’s entire PDF. (via The Millions)

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Bill Murray Interview at GQ

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A long and very interesting interview with Bill Murray is up at GQ; one of the most interesting things comes right up front, where we learn that anybody can get in touch with Bill Murray simply by calling an 800 number he set up. If he wants to talk to you, he’ll call you back. […]

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Win Free Novellas from Melville House

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Melville House is publishing three novellas translated from German this month, and they’re giving away a complete set to every tenth person who emails them. All you have to do is send an email to be considered! (via the Center for the Art of Translation)

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A Handful of Experimental Writers

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In an article that appeared in the Observer yesterday, a trio of writers introduces a trio of experimental authors. Skip past most of the article — it’s a bit of filler not worth the trouble — but check out the paragraphs towards the end, about Stewart Home and César Aira, which are a good quick […]

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Weigh in on the Long Haul

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Stacey Derasmo’s wonderful piece for the Blurb column, “The Long Haul,” is about the reasons writers keep writing — the reasons any artist keeps doing their work, really, whatever that work is. Have you read Derasmo’s piece? The discussion has been extensive, and you might have something to add. Check it out.

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Now playing: Winnebago Man

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There’s a pretty good chance you already have an idea who Jack Rebney is, even if you don’t recognize the name; if you don’t, you should immediately watch one of the clip reels that made him notorious: this one is my favorite (NSFW!) of the many edits. The video consists of outtakes from a sales […]

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Amazon Now Turning Authors Against Publishers

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You probably heard the news that Amazon has struck a controversial deal with literary agent Andrew Wiley. It works like this: digital rights are separate from print rights, and Wiley sold an exclusive 2-year license on digital rights, for a certain number of his authors, to Amazon. Or perhaps just the rights to 20 titles. […]

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The End of Forgetting? Not Quite

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Scott Rosenberg has written a thorough takedown of Jeffrey Rosen’s NYT Magazine piece, “The End of Forgetting.” When I read it yesterday, I felt like there was something amiss about it, and Rosenberg ably diagnoses the principal issues with Rosen’s examples: they don’t really support his thesis. But Rosenberg gets to the heart of the […]

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The Rumpus Book Club: Blogging Citrus County #4

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Join The Rumpus Book Club today to receive our second selection, Doug Dorst’s  The Surf Guru. ** Just a quick post today. Such a vigorous discussion about the book as a whole has been going on at our previous post (15 comments and counting), that I think it may well be a little superfluous for […]

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William Kunstler & Agnès Varda on POV

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This Tuesday and next, the PBS doc show POV is broadcasting two great documentaries that I highly recommend. Tomorrow at 1o pm (check local listings; your date and time may differ) check out William Kunstler: Disturbing the Universe. Kunstler made his name as a radical civil-rights and first-amendment attorney in the 60s — most famously, […]

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The Rumpus Book Club: Blogging Citrus County #3

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Join The Rumpus Book Club today to receive our second selection, Doug Dorst’s  The Surf Guru. ** Welcome to the continuing Rumpus Book Club Blog, where a Rumpus contributor reads the book of the month and regularly blogs about his or her reactions. It’s the first move in a conversation that we want you to […]

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The Rumpus Book Club: Blogging Citrus County #2

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Join The Rumpus Book Club today to receive our second selection, Doug Dorst’s  The Surf Guru. ** Welcome to the continuing Rumpus Book Club Blog, where a Rumpus contributor reads the book of the month and regularly blogs about his or her reactions. It’s the first move in a conversation that we want you to […]

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The Rumpus Book Club: Blogging Citrus County #1

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Welcome to the first post of the Rumpus Book Club Blog, where a Rumpus contributor reads the book of the month and regularly blogs about his or her reactions. It’s the first move in a conversation that we want you to join. Today, Rumpus Film editor Jeremy Hatch on what he hopes for from the […]

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Why Roger Ebert Thinks 3D Sucks

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A little while back, Roger Ebert wrote a great article on Newsweek entitled “Why I Hate 3D.” It’s a fun read, an entertaining rundown of all the ways in which 3D is a pointless novelty that mostly exists to help Hollywood feel better about its bottom line, and which — worst of all — is […]

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SFIFF53: Dispatch #6, Weekend Picks

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Coverage of the San Francisco International Film Festival by Rumpus Film editor Jeremy Hatch. There’s some great, possibly-overlooked-by-you stuff coming up in the festival today through Sunday, and these picks will give you the details on: a documentary by Tim Hetherington about a platoon in Afghanistan’s Korengal Valley; Kore-Eda’s new, touching film about an inflatable […]

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SFIFF53: Dispatch #5, Don Hertzfeldt

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Coverage of the San Francisco International Film Festival by Rumpus Film editor Jeremy Hatch. When programming director Rachel Rosen took the stage at the Kabuki last Friday night to present the Persistence of Vision Award to Don Hertzfeldt, she said, “let’s face it: we live in a narrative feature-length world,” and talked about how much […]

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SFIFF53: Dispatch #4, Opening Night, Micmacs

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Coverage of the San Francisco International Film Festival by Rumpus Film editor Jeremy Hatch. This is my third year covering film in San Francisco, but this opening night, which took place last Thursday, was the first I’ve ever attended, for any festival. For one thing, I really wanted to go to this particular one: Micmacs […]

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SFIFF53: Dispatch #3, Picks Through Wednesday

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Coverage of the San Francisco International Film Festival by Rumpus Film editor Jeremy Hatch. Today and over the next few days, I’ll be filing reports on the festival events and one-time screenings I attended over the weekend — opening night, Don Hertzfeld, Walter Murch, Sam Green’s Utopia in Four Movements — but for now I […]

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SFIFF53: Dispatch #2, Top Films to See

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Coverage of the San Francisco International Film Festival by Rumpus Film editor Jeremy Hatch. At the press conference for the festival given a few weeks ago, programming director Rachel Rosen characterized the selections as, overall, showing a return to basics and beauty — there is much less shaky cam work and jagged editing than there […]

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SFIFF53: Dispatch #1, Events Preview

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The largest and, arguably, the most glamorous film festival in San Francisco is about to get underway for the 53rd year in a row, and the Rumpus has been watching selected films and listening to buzz for the past two weeks. (The full schedule and tickets are available online from this page.) Read on for […]

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PEN World Voices Event in Berkeley

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Just a small addendum to Notable San Francisco this week: there’s an interesting event in Berkeley on Wednesday night at 7:30. PEN World Voices, with the assistance of Berkeley Arts & Letters, The Believer, and the Center for the Art of Translation, are presenting Tommy Wieringa (of the Netherlands) and Christos Tsilokas (of Australia) in […]

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Baseball Has-Beens Looking to Become Be-Agains

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The Christian Science Monitor just printed a great story by Jordan Heller that opened my eyes to a whole world I didn’t even know existed: baseball players who have dropped out of the major leagues for one reason or another, who are now in the minor leagues, and struggling to get back into the majors. […]

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How Market Forces Affect Novel Length

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A writer named Charlie Stross just posted a fascinating article on his blog about why novels are the length they are. The reasons have to do with market dynamics — costs faced by publishers and bookstores. In the Victorian era, novels could get tremendously long because they were published serially: writers could go on week […]

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Sensible Worries About the Internet

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“These new books share a concern with how digital media are reshaping our political and social landscape, molding art and entertainment, even affecting the methodology of scholarship and research. They examine the consequences of the fragmentation of data that the Web produces, as news articles, novels and record albums are broken down into bits and […]

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Jason Epstein on Publishing’s Future

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Jason Epstein started out as an editor and publisher in a now-vanished era — his first editorial job was at Random House in 1949 — and he was a co-founder of the New York Review itself and also the Library of America. He’s of an old school but he’s not a Luddite — in fact […]

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