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Posts Tagged: autobiography

“And She Went on Her Way Rejoicing”

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Muriel Spark and the perennial question: “Am I a woman or an intellectual monster?”

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The Rumpus Interview with Miriam Toews

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Miriam Toews talks about writing, mental illness, death with dignity laws, and the thin and sometimes troubling line between fiction and autobiography.

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New York Comics and Picture-Story Symposium: Marguerite Van Cook and James Romberger

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The New York Comics & Picture-Story Symposium is a weekly forum for discussing the tradition and future of text/image work. Open to the public, it meets Tuesday nights 7-9 p.m. EST in New York City.

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One and The Same

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Nosy readers often delight in sleuthing out the parallels between an author’s work and their life, as if an identifiable autobiographical source might change the meaning behind the words. So what happens when authors eliminate the boundary altogether? By calling these books novels you might say that Coetzee is holding onto a fig leaf. More […]

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A Memoirist’s Pact with the Reader

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At Salon, Dani Shapiro writes an open response to a reader who felt that Shapiro’s memoir Slow Motion wasn’t fully honest because it didn’t include all the details of her life. In it, she explains what memoir is and isn’t, and what honesty means for the form: When I write fiction, I make things up. I enter the […]

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“Who the Hell Cares About Anne Sexton’s Grandmother?”

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When we read a piece of fiction, we don’t assume—or at least we know we’re not supposed to assume—it’s a faithful recreation of an event in the author’s life. But what about when we read a poem? For Poetry, Kathleen Rooney writes about realizing Brian Russell’s poems about a wife’s terminal illness were not actually about the […]

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“Michael Kimball Writes Your Life Story”

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Vaguely reminiscent of our very own Letters in the Mail, Michael Kimball’s new book, Michael Kimball Writes Your Life Story (on a postcard) reinvents memoir in a way that would have Montaigne going postal. In his review, Joseph Riipi shares some of the itemized moments captured in Kimball’s collection, from facts that are clerical (“According to postcard […]

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