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Posts Tagged: book review

Desire Makes Storytellers of Us All: Anthropica by David Hollander

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What a fitting end to the postmodern literary experiment. Or are we just getting warmed up?

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Documenting Existence: Deed by Justin Wymer

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Wymer is grappling with survival, with the cost of the duplicity of identity.

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Still Wouldst Thou Sing: Nightingale by Paisley Rekdal

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Figures from antiquity—those masks of learned, privileged poets—are rendered utterly contemporary, down to earth.

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Identity Politics and the English Language: Naoise Dolan’s Exciting Times

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Who “owns” the English language?

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What We Need: Juan Felipe Herrera, Maw Shein Win, and John Freeman

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Barbara Berman reviews Every Day We Get More Illegal, Storage Unit for the Spirit House, and The Park.

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Beloved Names and Incantatory Powers: heidi andrea restrepo rhodes’s The Inheritance of Haunting

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And so it is an exorcism, yes, but also a song.

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The Cost of Liberation: Patsy by Nicole Dennis-Benn

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Patsy’s imagined freedom in America, she discovers almost immediately, was an illusion.

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The Sound of Beginning: Birthright by George Abraham

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These poems present a challenge to the typically imposed strictures of ownership, narrative, and solution.

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Identity as a Hall of Mirrors: Descent by Lauren Russell

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This book is a marriage of the real world and the imagination, the nexus of nonfiction and fiction.

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The World Is on Fire: Living Weapon by Rowan Ricardo Phillips

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A democratic art, the poet says, will take us through. Come November, vote.

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The Privilege of Anxiety: Mark O’Connell’s Notes from an Apocalypse

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What does our “future-dread,” as O’Connell puts it, show us about our own lives in the present?

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Reclaiming History from the Bigots: Jill Lepore’s This America

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History itself is not so conveniently tidy, and neither is this book.

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Girl Power: Quan Barry’s We Ride Upon Sticks

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But this is We Ride Upon Sticks: someone’s perm falls out, someone becomes prom queen.

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Homage as Provocation: Karen Tei Yamashita’s Sansei and Sensibility

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Pretend you are Austen. Enact an Austen novel. And what will happen?

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The Complications of #MeToo: Mary Gaitskill’s This Is Pleasure

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Quin, too, must make sense of his behavior and the consequences.

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Rites of Passage: Steven Toussaint’s Lay Studies

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We are liturgical animals, Toussaint’s poems suggest, designed to satisfy some ultimate desire with worship.

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