Posts Tagged: Cervantes

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #153: Julie Schumacher

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“I have to confess here that I never studied Shakespeare in college.”

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The Rumpus Interview with Emily Raboteau

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Emily Raboteau discusses her essay, “Know Your Rights!” from the collection, The Fire This Time, what she loves about motherhood, and why it’s time for White America to get uncomfortable.

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The Storming Bohemian Punks the Muse #2: In a World Gone Tilt-a-Whirl

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Society is falling apart, the daily news seems to say. Living in interesting times, it is all too easy to fear that our work is meaningless.

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Baffling Perfection

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The business of classics being perfect books is baloney. They are as defective, as inadequate as everything else in the universe. Careful readers see these flaws as reflections of their own frailty. Ilan Stavans, a man known for his love affair with the book, shares via Lit Hub his introduction to the quadricentennial edition of […]

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Burying Cervantes

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On a quest to determine if Don Quixote author Miguel de Cervantes died of cirrhosis of the liver, a Spanish forensic team uncovered seventeen bodies buried between 1612 and 1630 in Madrid’s Church of the Trinity, one of which was believed to be that of Cervantes. However, they were unable to conclusively identify any of the remains […]

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The Original Copycat

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Tim Youd has recently undertaken the task of reproducing Kingsley Amis’s Lucky Jim, but the Guardian says the idea of copying classic novels is not so original; Pierre Menard, a character in a Borges story, did it first: Although the words themselves were exactly the same, Pierre Menard’s fragmentary Quixote was judged to be “subtler than that […]

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Searching for Cervantes

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After a Times article last March criticized Spain (and its literary establishment) for failing to unravel the mystery of the precise location of Miguel de Cervantes’s grave, a reinvigorated search may have finally yielded results. Cervantes was buried in Madrid’s Trinitarias convent, but the specific site was not marked (or not marked well); the discovery […]

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