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Posts Tagged: Lit Hub

The Rumpus Interview with Jade Sharma

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Jade Sharma discusses her first novel Problems, the complicated feelings that came with debuting to rave reviews, and her writing and editing processes.

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This Week in Indie Bookstores

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An eight-time Jeopardy! winner is turning the cash into his dream: a bookstore. City Lights in San Francisco is offering up a special section featuring resistance literature. Bookstores in Washington, DC supported the Women’s March and hosted events through inauguration weekend.

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AWP 2017 Offsite: Write Together, Fight Together

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Don’t miss our 2017 AWP offsite event, co-hosted with Barrelhouse, Catapult, and Lit Hub! Write Together, Fight Together will include readings from: Jericho Brown, Nicole Dennis-Benn, Melissa Febos, Morgan Parker, and Sarah Sweeney, to be followed by music and dancing. Free admission, February 9, 2017, doors at 6:30 p.m., readings begin at 7 p.m. Join us as we […]

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This Week in Essays

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Bookbinding may be a dying art, but at Lit Hub, Dwyer Murphy tells the story of a man who keeps his business going strong on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. For Hazlitt, Suzannah Showler takes a measured look at the prepper community and at the idea of preparation itself.

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The Rumpus Interview with Terry McDonell

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Terry McDonell talks about his new memoir The Accidental Life and his career in the magazine business, which spans the beginning of New Journalism through the digital revolution.

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This Week in Essays

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Here at The Rumpus, this essay by Liz Latty on challenging the fairy tale myth of adoption is receiving a tremendous response from readers. Malloy Owen has written a mind-opening essay for The Point providing a valuable perspective that challenges liberals to reexamine liberalism. Many essays on the election results have expressed complete shock. Maurice Carlos Ruffin […]

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The Life and Times of Black Clock Magazine

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The legendary Black Clock has been retired. At Lit Hub, novelist Bruce Bauman, author most recently of Broken Sleep, recounts the magazine’s history in a conversation with Jeff VanderMeer: From the very beginning when Jon Wagner had hired Steve to start the magazine, it was clear the vison, the content—all final decisions would be Steve’s. I was […]

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This Week in Short Fiction

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Sometimes, literary magazines fold. It happens all the time because of funding, or manpower, or editorial differences. Usually, print back issues remain for sale and online content is preserved indefinitely, or at least until someone forgets to renew the domain. But this does not seem to be the case with Black Clock, the respected literary […]

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Arendt on Trump

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Evil is not one man, but rather the process of normalization via which exclusion, deportation, and finally extermination are all rendered morally justifiable. At Lit Hub, Rafia Zakaria writes an essay about Donald Trump’s rampant Islamophobia and how it can be read as emblematic of the evil Hannah Arendt theorized about in Eichmann in Jerusalum. Hannah […]

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The Swiping Game

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Over at Lit Hub, Bridget Read discusses the gender politics of Tinder, the rise of the Single Woman, and how these phenomena have permeated recent nonfiction by women: It makes sense that independence would be their chosen frontier, the pursuit of solitude their manifest destiny. The ability to be alone has long been the provenance […]

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How One Man Pioneered the Bookstore Business

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You might know about the invention of the printing press revolutionizing the business of publishing, but what about the revolution in actually selling those published books? At Lit Hub, John Pipkin shares innovating bookseller James Lackington’s story of creating a book-selling boon back in 18th century London—he was similar to Amazon’s Jeff Bezos in many ways.

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The Up and Downs of Literary Fame

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While we may envy writers with books that have just reached critical acclaim or won a prestigious prize, a writer’s fame often doesn’t last for very long. What happens when a writer finds that his fame and influence have waned? Over at Lit Hub, Tom Shroder shares his deeply personal account of living in the shadow of his […]

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Fake It Til You Make It

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Have you ever thought of vanishing into thin air? If so, you’re not alone. For Lit Hub, Elizabeth Greenwood investigates the pros and cons of leaving the world cold: Depending on your budget, you can even stage a phony funeral with mourners weeping over your open casket (a cadaver from a black market morgue as your […]

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Like Tears in Rain

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In a universe slowly sinking into entropy, writing can take the disordered pieces of our experience and fit their edges together into something organized. If the work of a writer is to tease out meaning from the tangled mess of life, many of these algorithms essentially do the opposite, taking meaningful human posts or experiences and reducing them […]

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Telling, Not Showing

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As I processed a dominant Euro-American writing pedagogy from the perspective of an aspiring fiction writer and an immigrant critic of color, I couldn’t stop wondering: are we, in 21st-century America, overvaluing a sight-based approach to storytelling? And could this be another case of cultural particularity masquerading itself as universal taste? Namrata Poddar tries to […]

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“Dear Abby” for Books

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Stop any comparisons… turn to your own project with laser-beam focus, and bolster your own campaign as if you’ve spent years of blood, sweat, and tears working on this creative achievement—because chances are, you have spent years working on it. Lit Hub launches a new advice column, “Ask the Publicists,” with publicists Kimberly Burns, Whitney […]

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Creating the Defamiliar Experience

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But I think of greater importance than a sense of commonality is one of understood difference. Fiction that respects us says, “I know you because I have not had your life.” For Lit Hub, Michael Helm writes on translation, examining Spanish-language literary fiction for moments of defamiliarization achieved through translation.

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Books You Can Deadlift

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At Lit Hub, Joshua Zadjman talks about Alan Moore’s Jerusalem as the new zenith of the modern doorstopper novel: What is Jerusalem? It’s an experience you can more easily press on people than explain to them. Moore’s 1,260-page second novel,Jerusalem, will land in bookstores later this month with acclaim, conjecture, and hopefully even a trumpet or two—but it’s likely that […]

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The Appeal of Ferrante and Knausgaard

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On Lit Hub, Stephanie Grant examines the deep pleasure and connection readers experience with the works of Elena Ferrante and Karl Ove Knausgaard. She suspects the familiar tone of both authors’ recent series might help otherwise fiction-averse readers dive into the narrative: To put it another way, the intimacy of first-person narration in these novels […]

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