Posts Tagged: Longreads

This Week in Essays

By

At Nowhere, Alia Volz takes a long-shot journey to Cuba to tie up loose ends. For Guernica, Katherina Grace Thomas writes about that time Nina Simone loved and left paradise. Here at The Rumpus, Alaina Leary considers the painful work of accounting for family possessions under dire circumstances.

...more

This Week in Essays

By

When Sandra A. Miller’s sister gets cancer, the family looks to their similar sense of humor as a way to power through in an essay on Literal Latte. Here at The Rumpus, Leslie Jill Patterson looks at the unprecedented action on death row in Arkansas and the ways we try to reassure ourselves in matters of state-sanctioned […]

...more

This Week in Essays

By

Last week was horrible and you need a laugh. Read Kate Washington’s imagined revolutionary National Parks meeting at McSweeney’s. For Longreads, Anjali Enjeti tackles her perceived outsider status, even as a first-generation American-born citizen. Read Davey Davis’s compelling dissection of the body horror genre here at The Rumpus.

...more

This Week in Essays

By

At Lit Hub, Jonathan Reiber, a former speechwriter for the Obama administration, weighs our souls and our words during this political transition. Chivas Sandage writes for The Rumpus about helping the men in our lives to fully understand the constant state of vigilance women live in. On Medium, Abbie VanSickle takes a thoughtful, personal look at the […]

...more

Readers’ Work

By

Vivid, shiver-inducing, short story excerpts stud “The Summer People of Shirley Jackson and Kelly Link” over at Longreads. On conjuring a story with the same title as Jackson’s original, iconic, and creepy “The Summer People,” Kelly Link says, “I liked the idea of writing a story where all the play between Jackson’s story and mine […]

...more

Museum Stories

By

For Longreads, Jaime Green writes about the narrative styles employed in exhibits at the American Museum of Natural History. Green focuses on the work of one of the AMNH’s directors, Albert E. Parr, and his efforts to connect the science of the museum with the lives of its visitors: Rather than showing one isolated capsule, […]

...more