Posts Tagged: Stephen King

The Outsider: A Conversation with Michelle Tea

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Michelle Tea discusses her forthcoming collection, Against Memoir, out tomorrow from Amethyst Editions/The Feminist Press.

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The Final Girl

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I wanted to be scared because being terrified taught me how to survive.

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Hearse and Home: How Stephen King Saved My Girlhood

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Down the steps of the second-story apartment above the hearse garage and across the alley was the library.

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Slush Piles in White

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The sensibilities of whiteness do not want us to work, do not want us to think, do not want us to imagine outside of its bounds.

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Libraries Are the Real Punk Rock

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Maybe I was only in the eighth grade, but I was ready to stand up to anyone who tried to threaten the ideal of intellectual freedom.

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Finding Comfort in the Discomfort: Talking with Juan Martinez

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Juan Martinez discusses his debut collection Best Worst American, his relationship to the English language, and why Nabokov ruined his writing for years.

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The Rumpus Review of It Comes at Night

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“It” does not even “come” in the traditional sense. These primal, atavistic qualities are with us all the time, lying dormant until the right situation coaxes them forth.

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The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Samantha Irby

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Samantha Irby discusses her new essay collection, We Are Never Meeting in Real Life, all that comes along with writing about your life, and reading great horror books.

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Literary Rim Shots: A Chat with John Grisham

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John Grisham discusses his advice for young writers, the literary mafia, and why he finally wrote a (literal) beach read.

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The Rumpus Interview With Danielle Trussoni

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Danielle Trussoni discusses her new memoir, The Fortress, black magic, the cult of marriage, and the dark side of storytelling.

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The Rumpus Interview with Rion Amilcar Scott

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Rion Amilcar Scott discusses his story collection Insurrections, father relationships, hip-hop, knowing when to abandon a project, and choosing not to workshop certain stories.

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The Rumpus Interview with D. Foy

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D. Foy discusses his latest novel, Patricide, the evolution of “gutter opera,” his writing process, free will, and memes.

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Murder Deferred

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Considering how prolific James Patterson and his team of writers are, it’s no surprise that he turned to “fan fiction” with a novel called The Murder of Stephen King. Unfortunately for those curious about the book, Patterson has cancelled its release, according Jackson Frons, writing at Electric Literature. Apparently, fans have been showing up uninvited at King’s house, which […]

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Anna March’s Reading Mixtape #29: Literary Bitches

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All too often, it gets hurled at strong women like a boulder of hate tied up with a big red misogynistic bow.

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Is Gender F***ing with Our Fantasies?

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To lift the censorship, degradation, and foreclosure of girls’ fantasies, we may have to investigate the gendered limitations on how we think about early loves, impulses, celebrity crushes, and maybe, sexually stirring gentleman pirates.

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A No-Hitter

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Not even James Patterson or Stephen King have reached a top-twenty spot with a new book on the New York Times‘s Bestseller list this year. Publishers are blaming mediocre sales of adult fiction on lessened media coverage due to recent acts of violence and terrorism and increased political coverage for the 2016 presidential race. Even so, it’s […]

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The Popular Vote

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The Library of Congress recently polled American citizens to find out what books had the most profound effect on them. Among the 17,000-plus survey respondents, popular answers were books like Frank Herbert’s Dune, Stephen King’s The Stand, and The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss. While some literary greats like Toni Morrison did not appear on […]

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Anna March’s Reading Mixtape #12: The Art and Craft of Writing

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The writing advice I give is this: 1) Sit down 2) Write These wise and talented writers have more to say.

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A Misreading of Misery

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NPR traces the history of Stephen King’s Misery from the novel, to the film, and, most recently, to the stage, and argues that this journey may have caused the story t0 lose a few key components: It is almost literally drained of blood and, more important, it is drained of urgency.

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The Rumpus Interview with David Lipsky

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David Lipsky, whose book was recently adapted into the movie The End of the Tour, discusses his career as a writer and journalist as it’s evolved in the twenty years since his road trip with David Foster Wallace.

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On Writing Too Much

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The works of prolific writers are often viewed as less-than-literary, like the largely forgotten books of mystery novelist John Creasey, author of 564 books. Even serious novelists like Joyce Carol Oates, author of more than fifty novels, can write so much they lose the critics’ interest. Semi-prolific author Stephen King (fifty-five novels) looks out how we consider highly […]

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Rewrite, Reboot, Remix

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Rewriting the classics has become a stale and risk-averse strategy. But that shouldn’t spoil the fun of our larger culture of remixing.

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Famous Writers with Weird Jobs

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Did you know that Chuck Palahniuk worked as a bike messenger? Or that both Stephen King and Ken Kesey worked as janitors? Or that Charles Dickens labeled jars in a shoe factory? Electric Literature has a fun infographic detailing these odd jobs and more. This should make writers of any stage feel better about the weird […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Daniel Torday

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Dan Torday talks about his novel, The Last Flight of Poxl West, the role of fear in fiction, the fabrication of facts in a memoir, and about being “constitutionally unoffendable.”

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The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Sarah Hepola

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Editor and writer Sarah Hepola talks about her new memoir Blackout, how gender affects alcoholism, writing about female friendships, and the writers who’ve influenced her.

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