Posts Tagged: The Guardian

This Week in Indie Bookstores

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The Guardian looks at how an Australian feminist bookstore took on MRA trolls. Two Dollar Radio, a Columbus-based independent publisher, plans to open a bookstore. A community bookstore in Amman, Jordan that charged a pay-what-you-can fee for books nearly went bankrupt, but was saved by crowdfunding from around the world.

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This Week in Trumplandia

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Welcome to This Week in Trumplandia. Check in with us every Thursday for a weekly roundup of the most pertinent content on our country, which is currently spiraling down a crappy toilet drain. You owe it to yourself, your community, and your humanity to contribute whatever you can, even if it is just awareness of […]

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This Week in Trumplandia

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Welcome to This Week in Trumplandia. Check in with us every Thursday for a weekly roundup of the most pertinent content on our country, which is currently spiraling down a crappy toilet drain. You owe it to yourself, your community, and your humanity to contribute whatever you can, even if it is just awareness of […]

...more

The Rumpus Interview with Bonnie Jo Campbell

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Bonnie Jo Campbell discusses her collection Mothers, Tell Your Daughters, the natural world as a character, and finding writing from the male point of view easier.

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The Rumpus Interview with Jessica Valenti

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Jessica Valenti discusses her memoir, Sex Object, how the experiences she touches on in her book shaped her, and how she discovered herself outside of those experiences.

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This Week in Essays

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For the office drones struggling to come back after the four-day weekend, take heart in James Livingston’s essay for Aeon considering whether work is necessary in our present age. Here at The Rumpus, Helen Betya Rubinstein expresses a sense of dislocation that’s familial and personal in the face of our newly reinforced election-cycle gender binary. For Vogue, […]

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This Week in Essays

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Here at The Rumpus, this essay by Liz Latty on challenging the fairy tale myth of adoption is receiving a tremendous response from readers. Malloy Owen has written a mind-opening essay for The Point providing a valuable perspective that challenges liberals to reexamine liberalism. Many essays on the election results have expressed complete shock. Maurice Carlos Ruffin […]

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Dancing about Writing

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At the Guardian, Zadie Smith writes about why dance is important for her and for her writing: The connection between writing and dancing has been much on my mind recently: it’s a channel I want to keep open. It feels a little neglected—compared to, say, the relationship between music and prose—maybe because there is something counter-intuitive about it. […]

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Contentious Comic BFFs

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You may have missed Matt Groening and Lynda Barry in Sydney this past weekend, but never fear: over at the Guardian, you can still read about their lifelong friendship, which persists despite diverging paths. Groening is best known for The Simpsons, Barry for Ernie Pook’s Comeek; it all began at Evergreen College, where Matt Groening edited […]

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Honoring Wonder Woman

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The United Nations is poised to name comic hero Wonder Woman an honorary ambassador for the empowerment of women and girls at an October 21 event, Alison Flood reports for the Guardian. The occasion, which coincides with the character’s 75th anniversary, “will also mark the launch of the UN’s landmark global campaign supporting Sustainable Development Goal […]

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American Lit’s Reclusive Editor

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Without editor Robert Gottlieb, contemporary classics such as True Grit and Catch-22 might not exist in the forms we know them—but that doesn’t seem to move him. In a rare interview for the Guardian, Michelle Dean visited Gottlieb at his New York home to talk about his long list of achievements, which he demurely brushes […]

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Putting the D in PhD

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An anonymous writer at the Guardian has a second career in erotica to fund their academic lifestyle, despite mixed reactions from colleagues: Colleagues in the arts react with a strange mixture of nervous supportiveness and embarrassed indifference. If I bring up the subject (in private conversations off-campus, naturally), the conversation is swiftly curtailed. I don’t know if this is […]

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Shakespeare Didn’t Make up as Many Words as We Think

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For the Guardian, Alison Flood writes on the bias of the Oxford English Dictionary towards “famous literary examples” instead of the actual origin, resulting in the incorrect attribution of several still-used words and phrases to Shakespeare. Flood writes that there are multitudes of evidence showing earlier usages of phrases such as “wild goose chase” and “it’s Greek […]

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The Endangered List

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The Dictionary of American Regional English, or DARE, has launched a campaign to save fifty words and phrases it deems are dying from lack of use, reports Alison Flood for the Guardian: Although language change is inevitable, it’s too bad to see some of our most colourful expressions going out of use,” said Joan Hall, former […]

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All That We Could Do with This Emotion

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Writing for the Guardian, novelist Val McDermid disputes the recent study which suggests that “literary” fiction readers are more empathetic than “genre” readers: There is no doubt that, historically, there was a valid distinction. Nobody would attempt to suggest that there is an equivalence between Agatha Christie and Virginia Woolf. (Let’s face it, Woolf couldn’t plot for toffee.) […]

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Stability in the Spinning Chaos

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Why is Catch-22 so widely read? According to the Guardian’s Sam Jordison, Joseph Heller’s novel is powerful because its protagonist Yossarian is “an old-fashioned hero”: Readers immediately cared about Yossarian, and his survival. Yossarian is the point of connection and understanding; a strong central fulcrum around which the chaos of the novel spins. He’s also that universally appealing […]

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