Posts Tagged: The Paris Review

On the Road

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In his monthly series “The Lives of Others” over at the Paris Review, Edward White introduces us to globe-trotting Turkish writer, Evliya Çelebi, and the esoteric but lively book of travel stories he penned almost four centuries ago: Evliya so adored the bustling energy of Istanbul that he dedicated the first volume of the Seyahatname to […]

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Tome of Black Womanhood

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One thing that interests me about Beyoncé is who her predecessors are, and how she’s a kind of symbol for all the different ways that black women are revered but also surveilled in a really intense way, put on display. Morgan Parker’s poetry collection, There Are More Beautiful Things Than Beyoncé, comes out in 2017. […]

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Ordinary Days of Grandeur

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Don’t miss the weekly staff picks over at the Paris Review. Lorin Stein recommends Brenda Shaughnessy’s soulful and stripped down So Much Synth, Jeffery Gleaves praises “mother writer” Rivka Galchen’s Little Labors, and Caitlin Youngquist writes of Bernadette Mayer’s Works and Days, “Hardly any of Mayer’s days are spectacular, but her eye is so keenly […]

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The Last Pilot

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Most writers have imagined the scene of their own death—in the hopes of stylizing the moment or savoring the thought of someone sifting through and publishing their old manuscripts. It seems that James Tate, even in death, outdid us all by leaving his earthly post in the most writerly way possible: with a delightful last […]

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Just Dance

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Well, that’s the point of being alone—it’s not anything to do with you. It’s about being something in someone else’s life, and no one ever knows the difference, or the truth. That’s why people like bad movies and bad fiction, and it’s worth it, it’s worth it, it’s worth it. Over at the Paris Review, Sadie […]

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Have Fish, Will Travel

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Italian novelist, essayist, and scholar Umberto Ecco passed away last Friday. The Paris Review has republished an essay by Ecco that originally appeared in its pages back in 1994. “Traveling with a Salmon” is about traveling with a salmon, but also about communication: My recent journey was brief: one day in Stockholm and three in London. In […]

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A Visual Guide for “How to Be Perfect”

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Count among your true friends people of various stations of life. Do not exclaim, “Isn’t technology wonderful!” Learn how to whistle at earsplitting volume. Still hunting for a good New Year’s resolution? No worries! Over at the Paris Review, Rumpus illustrator Jason Novak has endeavored to help you out with some visual inspiration, taking a […]

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Displaced in the Grotesque

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O’Connor is so often remembered as a misanthropic homebody—but she was comforted by the idea of a God that gave preferential treatment to the most vulnerable among us. For the Paris Review, Dave Griffith writes about reading Flannery O’Connor’s “The Displaced Person,” a story of immigrants in O’Connor’s classic grotesque South, during the global refugee crisis.

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Student and Teacher, Man and God

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At the Paris Review, H.S. Cross analyzes Ernest Raymond’s 1922 novel, Tell England. He explores the unique and charged relationships between a schoolteacher, Radley, and his students, Ray and Doe. The boys have an unexpected and, at least initially, seemingly erotic reverence for their teacher, which, Cross concludes, reflects the confusing and sacrificial relationship between man and […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Jenny Johnson

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Poet Jenny Johnson discusses her forthcoming debut collection, In Full Velvet, phobias, courage, the dual consciousness of queer lovers, and what it means to belong.

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Beig’s “Disappearing World”

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For the Paris Review, Matthew Neill Null wonders why American presses have yet to “take up” the catalog of German novelist Maria Beig, speculating that some might see her depiction of rural life as “too pat”: Will anyone in America give a damn about Beig? It’s hard to imagine our glittering zeitgest machine ever getting behind her, […]

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Nancy Drew, Girl Detective and Mentally Unstable Shape-Shifter

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In her many faces, the detective has always been both infinite and infinitely replicable, a paper-doll chain folded easily into a single entity, or expanded accordion-style into a string of captivating almost-duplicates. To become a top-rate teenage sleuth, you’ve got to prioritize: skip the movies and stick to the Morse Code manuals, no matter how […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Benjamin Percy

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Benjamin Percy discusses his latest novel, The Dead Lands, why it’s all about keeping language fresh, and his dream job writing for DC Comics.

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The Survival of Scripts

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Newspapers might be threatened by e-readers, technology may have supplanted books, and recipes can be found online in abundance. But scripts? Scripts are necessary. Scripts are tangible. They bow before no millennial’s avowedly shortened attention span. The Paris Review argues that while everything else goes digital, scripts will always be in print.

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The Rumpus Interview with Ottessa Moshfegh

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Ottessa Moshfegh discusses her first full-length novel, Eileen, betrayal, self-aware narrators, and the catalytic properties of friendship.

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Dry Magazines

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Desert managed, impressively, to publish lively, intelligent writing about a very dry place, month after month. Dan Piepenbring browsed through archive.org’s huge magazine collection to discover Desert, a publication from the Southwest entirely devoted to… deserts! You can read more and take a look at some of the magazine’s covers over at the Paris Review.

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