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Posts Tagged: The Toast

Grantland: A Rumpus Roundup

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At the end of October, ESPN announced that Grantland, the sports and culture website it had acquired, would cease publication. Some commentators claimed the site should have been shuttered sooner when Bill Simmons, the “voice” of Grantland, parted ways with ESPN. Now ESPN says it might have underestimated Simmons’s cult-like following. The site’s closure raises […]

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The Bro-ification of Beowulf

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BEOWULF: yeah actually I once held my breath for like a million hours it was crazy my friends weren’t even worried because I fight guys underwater like all the time Over at The Toast, Mallory Ortberg re-imagines the classic literary hero Beowulf in all the trappings and dirtbag swagger of a bro.

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The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Ijeoma Oluo

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Ijeoma Oluo discusses feminism, coloring, badass women, and being a troller of trolls.

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That Looks Disgusting

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Lilian Min writes for The Toast about the tangled politics of ugly food: I grew up in a household that was comfortable with farts, burps, intense smells, and food that facilitated all of the above. My dad would eat raw garlic and chase my sister and me around the kitchen, and then the whole family […]

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This Week in Short Fiction

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Leave it to The Toast to give us a story told by a mermaid as opposed to a story about one. And leave it to The Toast to find a very good mermaid storyteller indeed. On Wednesday, they released “Mermaids at the End of the Universe: A Short Story” by Kendra Fortmeyer, featuring illustrations by Stephanie […]

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Beyond Joy Luck

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At The Toast, Nicole Soojung Callahan, Christine Hyung-Oak Lee, Karrisa Chen, and others weigh in on the state of Asian-American literature: I grew up in L.A. and Long Beach. White people were always the minority in my schools and neighborhoods, so I’ve never imagined “white people” to be my audience. I never felt the need […]

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Questioning Harper Lee’s Editor Answers

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Here’s an author who has staunchly refused interviews and publicity since 1960, who hasn’t breathed a word about her interest in publishing another book to either family or friends, but who is suddenly fine with releasing her decades-old Mockingbird prequel, despite the fact that it doesn’t sound like anyone at her publisher has actually been […]

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Real Life Sci-Fi?

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Over at The Toast, Mallory Ortberg gives us a compendium of signs that you’re stuck in a soft sci-fi novel. Among the more notable signifiers: You live in a world where robots masturbate, for some reason. The ship’s doctor has a drinking problem. You’re going to have to go through the asteroid belt you’d hoped to avoid […]

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This Week in Short Fiction

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On Wednesday, Joyland published “You Said ‘Always’” an excerpt from Ester Bloom’s novel-in-progress, The Sex Lives of Other People. In the story, which has the momentous feel of the novel’s opening, the narrator, Annie, gets dumped by her boyfriend after a night of sex, turned down by her soon-to-be ex-husband, disappointed by her sister on […]

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Like Butter on Toast

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The Butter, The Toast’s new vertical run by Rumpus Essays Editor Emeritus Roxane Gay, has just launched. To present her latest venture, Gay wrote a Butter FAQ, stretching, in her typical style, from submission guidelines (spoiler: no guidelines!) to Nick Jonas, Solange, and of course, Ina Garten!

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Why Didion Remains

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We like to think of Joan Didion as glamorous, the sunglasses-wearing, VOGUE-working, New York loving-and-leaving writer that we all could have been if only life had turned out a little differently. We imagine her sitting down to edit with a cocktail at the end of the day (her actual practice), writing screenplays with her handsome […]

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Boston, Take It or Leave It

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Poe is more of a Bostonian than he liked to think, not in spite of but because of his criticism of the place, because of his keen awareness of the oft-commented upon socio-economic differences that still plague Boston today. Surprisingly, Edgar Allan Poe and his hometown Boston shared a reciprocal dislike. Molly Labell—a New Yorker […]

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