Posts Tagged: The Toast

Just Doing It: A Conversation with Mallory Ortberg

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Mallory Ortberg discusses their new book, The Merry Spinster: Tales of Everyday Horror, what it means to be a self-taught writer, and questioning gender.

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Keeping It Real

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Sometimes God needs to cut the crap and level with his devotees. As we enter the final week of regular posts at The Toast, Mallory Ortberg has given us an updated translation of such moments: But you, son of man, can I just be honest with you for a minute? Do not be rebellious like that rebellious […]

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The Catch-22 of Representation

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Heroine Complex author Sarah Kuhn writes on her impulse as a child to dislike Jubilee, the Marvel superhero she was “supposed” to identify with as an Asian-American woman, and the pressures of creating representative characters for women of color in a marketplace with so few: Instead of worrying that the entertainment I consumed elevated bad […]

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Lost Languages

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When we can’t bear to look at the object of our desire straight-on, a metaphor becomes necessary. Over at The Toast, Iona Sharma throws herself into the study of Gaelic, contemplating its beauty and its dwindling use as she unpacks her complicated relationship with Hindi: Here’s how the story is supposed to end. That because […]

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Growing Up with ADHD

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Despite the narrative that we are over-diagnosing ADHD in children, symptoms of ADHD often go unrecognized in girls. At the Toast, Grace Lidinsky-Smith discusses navigating grade school with undiagnosed ADHD, her experiences with feelings of shame, and the impact of finally receiving treatment: I wanted to write this for my younger self, and for all […]

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(Attractive) Debut Novelists Earn Millions

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Emma Cline received $2m advance for The Girls, due out in June, which puts her near the top of a growing list of first-time writers with advances in the millions. Last year, City on Fire earned Garth Risk Hallberg a $2m advance. The allure of debut novelists isn’t always an economic issue: Given the amount of […]

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The Faces of The Face on the Milk Carton

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The YA novel The Face on The Milk Carton has marked a thrilling yet disturbing rite of passage for many young readers over the past 25 years, iconic right down to its simple, haunting cover—which many of those readers could easily conjure from memory. Mallory Ortberg, literary comedian and maestro of The Toast, was one […]

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More Money, (Not) More Problems

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In a powerful and anecdotal essay at The Toast, Nicole Chung discusses how money-related anxiety has stayed with her into adulthood, and how disparity between her and her husband’s attitudes toward money influences the dynamic of their marriage: It makes it sound as though my money-related anxiety is nothing more than an unfortunate personality quirk, […]

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Tech Companies Profit While Writers Starve

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Digital media companies are suddenly worried about declining ad revenue, and the venture capitalists funding these companies have also turned off the faucet of cash as they realize that success stories like BuzzFeed and Mashable are not the unicorns everyone thought they were. Instead, the big winners have been the technology companies like Google and […]

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Why Are You On Your Knees? That Looks Boring

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In an essay for The Toast, Anne Marquette reveals the parallels between living as asexual and living as an atheist. In both cases, society surrounds you with guidelines to peak experiences—salvation, true love—that don’t apply to you. The only sensible thing to do is make up your own rules: There will always be a tension […]

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Building Your Dream Library

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For the daytime version of your library you need some natural light. How will your library illustrate the romance of pursuing knowledge if you can’t see dust particles floating in sunbeams? How are you going to achieve enlightenment without light? Book-lovers know all too well the struggle to find places to store all their books; who […]

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Our Literary Footpaths

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Over at The Toast, Rebecca Turkewitz writes about the intersections between literary geography and the real, from Joyce’s Dublin and Tolkien’s Middle Europe to Faulkner’s Mississippi and Munro’s Ontario—how we explore these places by walking through pages, and how they map to our homes and street corners.

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The Gift of Gratefulness

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The worst insult people hurl at adoptees is that they are “ungrateful” and should “go back” (to their “own” countries, to their old families). That is the moment when adoption becomes a gift—because that is the moment when it becomes clear that adoption belongs to people like the adoptive parent and not people like the […]

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