Posts Tagged: Art

The Storming Bohemian Punks the Muse #7: The Art of the Accidental Selfie

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One recent hot weekday afternoon, I told my partner—the guy who created the “Punk the Muse” logo and draws its cartoons—that I wanted to get out and about. We’d been sitting at home too long. Moon’s Handbook for Northern California revealed an abandoned mine, with a ghost town and an old Western cemetery, a half […]

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Finding Your Voice

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Authenticity of voice can only come from authentic work. And authentic work doesn’t come from the head; it’s an outgrowth of authentic feeling. In a post for the Ploughshares blog, Annie Weatherwax considers how writing an artistic statement can help artists and writers find their voice. She writes: “As an artist, the artistic statement requires […]

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Sex, Money, and Art Forgery

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“Novels about psychically and sexually burdened paintings have a rich literary pedigree,” writes UNC Professor of Art History Maggie Cao for Public Books. Cao’s essay tackles the subject of forgery, which puts “the intimate, almost magical role that works of art play in people’s emotional and erotic lives” into conversation with modern market forces that have, as […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Connie Wanek

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Connie Wanek discusses her latest book, Rival Gardens: New and Selected Poems, the challenge of looking back at older poems, and what prioritizing writing looks like.

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The Rumpus Interview with Sara Benincasa

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Comedian Sara Benincasa opens up about her latest book Real Artists Have Day Jobs, adjusting to success, Venn-diagramming love, and the loss of Morley Safer.

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The Surprising Art of Dr. Seuss

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In addition to being a world famous children’s writer, Theodor Seuss Geisel (aka Dr. Seuss) was also a prolific artistic who produced dozens of illustrations, paintings, and sculptures. “Geisel dubbed his secret collection, containing about 200 works, the ‘Midnight Paintings,’” the Toronto Star writes. You can check out the collection at the Pendulum Gallery in Vancouver until July […]

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Podcatcher #3: Poetry Jawns

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Emma Sanders and Alina Pleskova charm us with their affection for each other, DIY ethos, and belief on Poetry Jawns, what matters is the work.

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Song of the Day: “Everything In Its Right Place”

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“Yesterday I woke up sucking on lemon,” sings Thom Yorke in the enthralling first song from Radiohead’s groundbreaking 2000 album, Kid A, which Rolling Stone called the “weirdest Number One album of the year.” Take what you will from Yorke’s reference to lemons—their bitterness, the possibility of making lemonade out of them—but the message in the title […]

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Unlinking Mental Illness and Creativity

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The idea that “mental illness is the heart of creativity” has persisted for decades. But this idea can negatively impact one’s ability to seek help that they truly need. At The Establishment, Sarah Bronson debunks the notion that treating mental illnesses like depression unilaterally has a negative impact on one’s ability to create: I recognize […]

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Jen Fitzgerald’s Poetry Mixtape #2: Poets on Poetry and Art

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I’m spending National Poetry Month at the Millay Colony, former home of Edna St. Vincent Millay. My colleague and friend, poet and writer Jen Fitzgerald, will be writing the Mixtape column this month—and we are all lucky for it. Enjoy Jen’s robust selections and I’ll see you in May.

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Michelangelo vs. Raphael

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Having goaded the formerly pre-eminent Michelangelo by winning papal favour and sneaking into his as-yet unfinished Sistine Chapel, Raphael further insulted his Florentine rival in the Laocoön competition. The Public Domain Review tells the story of how the restoration of Laocoön and His Sons only further deepened the rivalry between Renaissance artists Michelangelo and Raphael.

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Rubbing Elbows

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Sometimes it feels like New York isn’t full of interesting people so much as people who are more interesting than you. For BuzzFeed Books, John Wray describes the mediocrity of being surrounded by greatness: Who did I think I was, with my childish, provincial, self-indulgent scribblings?

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Art Should Make Things Worse

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Art shouldn’t be mere normalizing sublimation or queer desublimation, which amounts to the same thing. Should actually make your problems worse. Only then can the fantasy of endless role-playing and analysis be traversed. Art is, in this way, less delusional than psychoanalysis. The Believer Logger interviews poet, performer, and critic Felix Bernstein about art and pathos.

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Artists as Activists

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I was recently asked by a young interviewer if writing, with all the time it takes and its use of paper (though I compose on a computer) is not antithetical to what is needed now, the speed that is, to push a speedy change of consciousness and behavior. I answered: “But it’s the writers who […]

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Art as a Tool for Action

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Over at NPR, Molly Crabapple discusses her new memoir Drawing Blood, her involvement in Occupy Wall Street, and how she became a political artist: …for a long time I felt like going to protests was the same as—you know, when people go to church but they don’t really believe in God? But they think, oh, better […]

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A Conversation with Ivan Vladislavić

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Tristan Foster interviews South African writer Ivan Vladislavić on the importance of art in his writing, having a large body of work, and the appeal (or lack of appeal) of cities: Our love for cities is always unrequited. Johannesburg is not an easy place to live: I’m deeply attached to it, and endlessly intrigued by its […]

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Valuation Methods

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In some of my fantasies, I make a pitch for art or for truth, defend them like commodities.

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Paris Forever

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That’s not to say being informed isn’t important—of course it is—but I suddenly felt a more important calling. I remembered the words of Marlon Brando in the wake of 9/11: “This is exactly the time for poetry!” Over at Lit Hub, Tyler Malone writes about the recent tragic events in Paris and finding some relief […]

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Belize’s Art Revolution

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At Electric Literature, Monica Byrne discusses the ongoing art revolution in Belize, and how artists create works that represent a diverse and beautiful country dealing with the trauma of postcolonialism: If an artist isn’t interested in protest per se, how does one articulate a visual language of pleasure that is truly their own, and not […]

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Nudes of Wall Street

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Writing for Broadly, Stassa Edwards has this profile of Nona Faustine, a photographer whose nude self-portraits aim to expose New York’s history of slavery. Faustine’s “White Shoes” is a series is a kind of memorial to that history, an attempt to conjure up the spirits of black women who were demeaned and sold in Manhattan’s […]

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Song in the Subjunctive

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Perhaps the city looked more poignantly lovely because I was conscious of its tragic history.

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A Library in an Abyss

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A Swedish artist has converted an old mining shaft into a library that disappears into an endless abyss. The library is actually a sculpture, part of a 55-piece show, Sculpture by the Sea, located in Denmark. Colossal takes a look at this unique library, titled “When My Father Died It Was Like a Whole Library […]

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Printing Out All Humanity’s Knowledge

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Wikipedia hopes to one day contain all of mankind’s (literally, mankind’s) knowledge in a singular repository. Artist Michael Mandiberg decided to create a hard copy and start printing out the online encyclopedia—all 7,600 volumes of it. The New York Times spoke to Mandiberg about the project “From Aaaaa! To ZZZap!” on the eve of the […]

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Song of the Day: “Sunday Candy”

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In an interview with XXL magazine in 2014, Chance the Rapper pointed out the complex relationship between rap music and profits. He argued: “I don’t think selling [songs] is the right way to do it. It’s more about spreading it… And once this bohemian community really, fully [develops], the value of music will go up. […]

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