Posts Tagged: bookslut

Publishing’s Culture of Positive

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Recently, Jessa Crispin shocked the literary world by announcing she would be closing Bookslut, the literary blog she started fourteen years ago. Since then she has stirred some controversy, calling the Paris Review “boring as fuck” (the Paris Review took the critique in stride, offering a 10% discount with the code BORINGASFUCK) and attacking online literary […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Jessa Crispin

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Jessa Crispin talks about The Dead Ladies Project and The Creative Tarot, founding Bookslut, why she has an antagonistic relationship with the publishing industry, and her estrangement from modern feminism.

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Call Me Friend

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Patrick James Dunagan explores the human and professional relationship between Herman Melville and Nathaniel Hawthorne in a review of Erik Hage’s book on the subject over at Bookslut: Hawthorne inspired and reinforced Melville’s conviction to elevate the writing of Moby-Dick beyond any of the parameters he had previously explored with his earlier work. Melville’s “Mosses” review […]

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Feminism Today

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At the Los Angeles Review of Books, editor and founder of Bookslut.com Jessa Crispin writes on feminism in its contemporary incarnation by way of two recent critiques of 50 Shades of Grey. She draws a distinction between feminism (a discourse) and feminism (a table-turning form of social domination) wherein “The bullied become the bullies [and the] […]

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The Literary Legacy of Ursula K. Le Guin

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At Bookslut, Julie Phillips writes about how Ursula K. Le Guin, who has worked largely in science-fiction and fantasy, deserves a place in the literary canon. Her work is shaped by the books of Italo Calvino and Virginia Woolf, and it’s had an outsize influence on writers like Junot Díaz and Michael Chabon, whose artistic […]

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The (Imagined) Woman Reader and Male Anxiety

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“The Contemporary Male Novelists fear the Female Reader is no longer willing to interpret rampant misogyny as searing self-portraits of mangled masculinity, but rather as just more misogyny and who needs it? Their livelihoods threatened, the CMNs are doing the utmost in their narratives to tell the imagined female reader that they are at least […]

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Brown’s Modernist Journals Project

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Greer Mansfield of Bookslut checks out the Modernist Journals Project, a literary site launched in 1995 by Brown University that acts as a digital library of magazines associated with Modernism. The Modernist Journal Project contains a wide variety of oft-written about Modernist periodicals like The Egoist and The English Review amongst others that were associated with a […]

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From Travel To War Writing

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“The guidebook I researched last winter was never published, put on hold when the Arab Spring surged into Libya that February. I was writing a guidebook to a country that no longer exists; a country where busloads of Italian tourists gathered around hotel buffets; where billboards advertised the Qaddafi brand—forty-one years, they sang, the leader’s […]

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Post-Revolt Lit

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“The concept of the ‘individual’ has been born during these revolts. At the same time, tribal structures and ethnic traditions will not simply disappear. Tribal culture will have to enter into a modern framework and that is very complicated but individualism is here to stay.” In this interview, Moroccan-born novelist and poet Ben Taher Jelloun […]

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Obscured Greatness

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Bookslut zeroes in on the seemingly perpetual obscurity of women’s work in the arts. Looking at artists like Lee Krasner, Leonor Fini, and Mina Loy,—the spaces and roles that they were pushed into, along with the often intangible forms of sexism confronted—the piece wonders how to “restore women to the historical record without getting out […]

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Letter Writers

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All hacking aside, are we not all snoopers? This interview with Jonathan Keates tackles “great letter writers”—Lord Byron, Stendhal, Queen Victoria, Henry James, Evelyn Waugh—and the legacy of their correspondences. He also ruminates on the death of “the letter as a physical phenomena,” and fantasizes about its rebirth: “There may come a time when the […]

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Travel Fail?

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You know that pervasive storyline that says that travel will transform you, change your life, and help you find yourself? What if that does not happen; have you “failed” at travel? This essay considers that question, and takes notice of that pressure on travel writers to “create a personal arc of transformation,” pointing out that […]

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80s Difference

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Looking back at 80s media, this video curated essay examines the meaning of difference in Miami Vice, Pretty in Pink, and Ferris Bueller, through the lens of author Mash Tupitsyn’s own coming of age. Reflecting on her motivations for identifying with gender-bending as a young girl, she writes, “We thought images were the road to […]

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Birthdays, Exiles

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Perhaps you have thought about what you would take and where you would go if forced to flee the country because of your communist beliefs? In honor of Pablo Neruda’s birthday, Daybook describes the poet’s flight from Chile to Argentina. Traveling by packhorse with a bottle of whiskey, typewriter, and unfinished Canto General in tow, […]

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In Defense of the Other Woman

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Where are the books about mistresses? Bookslut’s Jessa Crispin writes about the lacking mistress narrative, defending the other woman and scrutinizing her treatment in society as undermining that traditional institution that tons of Americans love (marriage). “The woman is supposed to tend to her own nest, that’s her nature, and so with the mistress there […]

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Historians Blog Too

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“The point is that while we cherish open-ness or dialogue, we relish our closed structures and cordoned-off and privileged hallways. Academic blogging, to this graduate student, was a way out of this clubbiness.” Bookslut’s interview with historian Manan Ahmed praises academic blogging and encourages historians to partake in the dialogue. His political blog, Chapati Mystery, […]

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Good News for Literary Journals

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What’s the difference between a literary journal and a mayfly? The literary journal’s reputation for short lifespans might not be justified. According to Daniel Nester and Steve Black, authors of the article “Here Today, Here Tomorrow: On the Lifespan of the Literary Magazine,” literary journals are actually far more resilient than you may think. Using […]

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Books For The Politically Alienated

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The founding editor of Bookslut offers an eclectic selection of books that might help us confront our own deeply American sense of political alienation. One of them I especially want to read: Avoiding Politics: How Americans Produce Apathy in Everyday Life by Nina Eliasoph, a book title that speaks to the person inside of me […]

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The Horniest Species Imaginable

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“Only with the relatively recent shift from off-the-land foraging to agriculture did our species veer away from cooperation and sharing, even sharing of mates, in small groups; hierarchy, sexual repression and violence may pass for the human normal nowadays, but it wasn’t always so.” At Bookslut, a detailed discussion of the points made in the […]

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No One Belongs Here More Than My Therapist’s Wife

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It’s funny, I love Miranda July’s stories but Gordon Haber at Bookslut is insightful about her varied titles: “We Are Vaguely Included seems to show the influence of Miranda July, who has demonstrated talent in numerous genres while consistently formulating vaguely inclusive titles. July has a performance piece, Things We Don’t Understand and Are Definitely […]

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The Rumpus Sunday Book Blog Roundup

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Good things happen when people who grow up listening to Thriller become poets. There’s going to be a new Bukowski exhibit down Southern California way, including his “annotated racing forms” that will teach you his system for playing the horses. Jason Pinter takes on the idea that men don’t read. “I guess in this world, […]

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The Sunday Rumpus Book Blog Roundup

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My relationship with the book blogs has hit a snag. Today, we got in a throw-down fight, and I came pretty close to breaking some china. It’s just that the blogs whine and worry and complain a lot, and they always seem to want to cheat on me with famous writers, like Martin Amis or […]

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The Bravery Of Uncertainty

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“When you’re not religious, sacredness means something that fills you with awe. The creation of something awe-striking requires a pure offering, an opening up to the universe. It’s not always an act of risk, that could land you “in the clink” or with a broken body or with your blood trickling out onto the sidewalk, […]

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On The Forgotten Magic Of Writing

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“I’m so, so tired of reading about how writing should be demystified, how it doesn’t work the way Cortazar describes at all, how you toil at it slowly like you’re scrubbing a toilet, how the important parts are rewriting everything (preferably with the help of a gaggle of fellow workshop women) and killing your darlings […]

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The Rumpus Sunday Book Blog Roundup

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After reviewing the book blogs this week, I’ve decided that if I see the words “Dan Brown” ever again I’m going to punch myself in the eyes with a Da Vinci Code decoder ring. To save you some time, here’s what they have to say about him: He makes a lot of money. And he’s not […]

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