Posts Tagged: David Mitchell

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #81: Chanelle Benz

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Chanelle Benz’s debut collection, The Man Who Shot Out My Eye Is Dead, is filled with characters often facing a moral crossroads. The stories contain the unexpected, like a classic Western complete with local brothel as well as a gothic tale. Benz’s writing has appeared in Electric Literature, Guernica, The American Reader, and Granta.

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VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Abeer Hoque

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Abeer Hoque talks about coming of age in the predominantly white suburbs of Pittsburgh, rewriting her memoir manuscript ten times, and looking for poetry in prose.

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Notable Chicago: 1/13–1/19

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Saturday 1/14: David Mitchell discusses his debut novel We Hold These Truths with Dave Baron, author of Pembroke: A Rural, Black Community in the Indiana Dunes. The authors will address the intertwining issues explored by their books. 57th Street Books, free. Sunday 11/15: #WRITERSRESIST events are happening all over the city. Readers at The Loop reading […]

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In the Year 2114

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David Mitchell’s latest work will not be read for another one hundred years. He recently handed over the manuscript, called From Me Flows What You Call Time, to the Future Library in Oslo, Norway. He is the second author to contribute the project, the first being Margaret Atwood. Each year from now until 2114, one author will be […]

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Latest Salvo in Genre War

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David Mitchell, author of Cloud Atlas and The Bone Clocks, has been nominated for both “literary” and “genre” awards, putting him in a somewhat unique position to comment on the ever-raging literary vs. genre war: “It’s convenient to have a science fiction and fantasy section, it’s convenient to have a mainstream literary fiction section, but these […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Adam Johnson

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Pulitzer Prize–winning author Adam Johnson talks about his new book, Fortune Smiles, fiction and voice, veterans and defectors, solar-powered robots and self-driving cars, and infrared baseball caps that can blind security cameras.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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Imagine a world in the late 21st century: countries are underwater from the rising oceans, Europeans have become refugees, and a mathematical formula has been discovered that explains the entire universe, the applications of which include human flight (sans airplane) and the ability to remove pain and grief. That’s the world Lesley Nneka Arimah has […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Susan Barker

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Susan Barker discusses her third novel, The Incarnations, writing dialogue in a second language, the Opium Wars and Chinese history, and the years of research that went into her book.

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Mitchell Finds His Inner Tolkien

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After reading from his forthcoming release Slade House at the Edinburgh International Book Festival, David Mitchell announced that he has created “his own version of middle earth.” Like Mitchell’s prior works, Slade House will incorporate various genres and points of view: I like to use genre as a tool, like style, structure or a character. Where does it say […]

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Tart, Mitchell, and Gaiman to the Rescue

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After years of financial struggle, Barnes & Noble’s enlists renowned authors like Donna Tart, David Mitchell and Neil Gaiman to help compete with Amazon this holiday season. While Tart and Mitchell will contribute thousands of signed books to helps bolster sales, Gaiman has planned appearances at several of the chain’s bookstores.

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Profile of “Pangaeic” Writer David Mitchell

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Fans of Cloud Atlas, a sextet of sweeping stylistic range, know well that Granta-recognized author David Mitchell has a knack for mimesis. But they may not know that he is also “uncommonly good at imitating nonhuman noises.” In anticipation of his new “psychovoltaic” novel, The Bone Clocks, Catherine Schultz walks with him through the Irish […]

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What Twitter Could Mean for Fiction

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Following the publication of David Mitchell’s short story “The Right Sort” on Twitter last week, Ian Crouch considers the possibilities and limitations of the medium for fiction. He admires some of Mitchell’s tweets, wonders if the story isn’t actually better read all at once, and suggests “The Great American Twitter Novel” could potentially exist: I like […]

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This Week in Short Fiction

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On Monday, Cloud Atlas author David Mitchell began tweeting a short story called “The Right Sort” in multiple daily installments, compiled by Sceptre Books, readable from the top down. Set to conclude today, the story takes the Valium-filtered perspective of a young teen in 1970s England. BBC Radio 4 spoke with Mitchell, who only recently joined Twitter, […]

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A Father’s Striking Photos of His Autistic Son

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In the vein of Naoki Hagoshida’s The Reason I Jump (and David Mitchell’s Guardian essay), photographer Timothy Archibald created a breathtaking series of portraits of his autistic son Elijah. Archibald originally started taking the photos “so he could show them to behavioral specialists,” but they “became a bonding experience between father and son, and allowed them to create […]

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Novelist David Mitchell on His Son’s Autism

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In an essay for The Guardian, David Mitchell (author of the novels Cloud Atlas and Black Swan Green, among others) provides a moving and honest account of the experience of raising a son with autism. While the diagnosis came as a shock—and gave way to more difficulties and struggles than he’d imagined—Mitchell writes that he has learned to […]

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Announcing the 2011 Music Issue of the Believer !!

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Ladies and Gentlemen, the 2011 Music Issue of the Believer Magazine is upon us. This year’s issue has got some unprecedented audible sensations, which I will relay in the following list: 1. Trey Anastasio of Phish is interviewed for this issue (did you know that’s rare?). You’ll find out about improvisation exercises, their tempo issues […]

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Notable New York, This Week 7/12 – 7/18

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This week in New York Diane Williams, Rebecca Curtis and Joshua Cohen read at The Bastille Day Soirée, Chuck Klosterman is back Eating Dinosaurs, Candance Bushnell embodies Carrie and takes us back to college,  Christopher Finch tells us about Chuck Close’s Life, David Mitchell Reads, Soda Pop hosts a reading series, Williamsburg promotes Martial Arts, […]

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