Posts Tagged: Deesha Philyaw

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Erika T. Wurth

By

Erika T. Wurth talks about her latest book, Buckskin Cocaine, persevering through rejection, and white writers writing Native characters. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Samantha Irby

By

Samantha Irby discusses her new collection, We Are Never Meeting in Real Life, her reluctance to call herself a writer, and writing for the “cream jeans” crowd. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Lisa Factora-Borchers

By

Lisa Factora-Borchers talks about being a Catholic feminist, writing across genres, and pushing back against a singular narrative about New York. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Tamiko Nimura

By

Tamiko Nimura talks about the influence of history, memory, and silence on her work; creating a private MFA for herself; and writing a generational memoir. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Angie Thomas

By

Angie Thomas discusses her debut novel, The Hate U Give, landing an agent on Twitter, and why she trusts teenagers more than the publishing industry. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Yona Harvey

By

Yona Harvey talks about her path to becoming a poet, Winnie Mandela as an artistic inspiration, and what it means to write more publicly. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Abeer Hoque

By

Abeer Hoque talks about coming of age in the predominantly white suburbs of Pittsburgh, rewriting her memoir manuscript ten times, and looking for poetry in prose. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Tara Betts

By

Tara Betts discusses her newest collection, Break the Habit, the burden placed on black women artists to be both artist and activist, and why writing is rooted in identity. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Jaquira Díaz

By

Jaquira Díaz discusses the challenge of writing about family members, her greatest joy as a writer, and her literary role models. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Cole Lavalais

By

Cole Lavalais discusses her debut novel, Summer of the Cicadas, why she’s a huge fan of outlining, and the importance of dedicated communities for black writers. ...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

By

First, in the Saturday Interview, Deesha Philyaw talks to celebrated writer Darryl Pinckney about his latest novel, Black Deutschland, and drawing inspiration from Christopher Isherwood’s The Berlin Stories. Pinckney describes Berlin as “a somewhere not everyone wanted to bother with.” Racism in American history caused many to flee to Europe because it was “a personal solution to a mass problem,” Pinckney says, “like passing for white.” They go on to discuss his friend and influence Susan Sontag; Paris, love, and the differences between fiction and memoir.

...more
Darryl Pinckney

The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Darryl Pinckney

By

If your family or your people are looking over your shoulder, change your seat or push them away. Ask them to trust you with the truth. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Tania James

By

Tania James discusses her most recent novel, The Tusk That Did the Damage, the challenges of writing an elephant narrator, and the moment when she knew she could be a writer. ...more

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Desiree Cooper

By

Desiree Cooper discusses her debut collection of flash fiction, Know the Mother, what mother-writers need, and why motherhood is the only story she’s ever told. ...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

By

First, Brandon Hicks exercises his satirical muscle in “The Cartoonists: Profiles.”

Then, in the Saturday Essay, Steven D. Howe bravely exposes his relationship with his father to the light, a relationship bruised by alcoholism and Howe’s own fear of perpetuating the cycle of addiction.

...more

The Sunday Rumpus Interview: A Roundtable on Writing, Editing, and Race

By

With Lisa Factora-Borchers, Patrice Gopo, Jennifer Niesslein, Tamiko Nimura, and Deesha Philyaw. ...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

By

First, National Book Award finalist Angela Flournoy talks with Deesha Philyaw in the Saturday Interview. They discuss themes pertinent to Detroit, the setting of Flournoy’s book, The Turner House. Some include housing discrimination, hip-hop, respectability politics, and the challenges of writing truthfully about the African American experience in that storied and troubled city.

...more
Angela Flournoy

The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Angela Flournoy

By

My ambition is personal. I don’t think I need to succeed so that the race can succeed. ...more