Posts Tagged: economics

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Adrian Matejka

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Adrian Matejka discusses his new collection Map to the Stars, writing about poverty in contemporary poetry, and how racism maintains its place in our society.

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Personal, Political, and Poetic: A Conversation with Susan Briante

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Susan Briante discusses The Market Wonders, her newest collection of poetry in which she draws on market indicators like the Dow Jones Industrial Average to construct a criticism of contemporary culture.

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Are Writers Too Safe?

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Is a lack of economic stability making writers too safe? Maggie Doherty argues “yes”: Nearly half a century later, we find ourselves at a different sort of crisis point. Radical literary experimentation continues, but it has become the privilege of a few. In Barth’s day, a robust welfare state supported writers. Public patronage programs provided […]

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Valuation Methods

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In some of my fantasies, I make a pitch for art or for truth, defend them like commodities.

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The Paradox of Growth As Good

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Martin Kirk writes for Aeon on the paradoxical connection between economic growth and eliminating poverty. Kirk illustrates that increasing the size of the economic pie, by spending the world’s finite resources, with no change in distribution to impoverished populations, will not only not eradicate poverty in the near future, but will only accelerate the depletion […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Matt Bell

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Author Matt Bell talks video games, fiction, nonfiction, politics, empathy, and his new books, Baldur’s Gate II: Shadows of Amn and Scrapper.

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Creativity Builds Healthy Economies

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Creativity is an essential component of a healthy economy, and Western nations are doing a terrible job of fostering intellectual creativity. Writers, artists, and thinkers are underpaid, as developed economies have given priority to a corporate model of shareholders and profits rather than innovation. Over at the New York Review of Books, Edmund S. Phelps explains that jumpstarting the […]

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The Novel of Economics

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Following her essay about the influence of Adam Smith’s economic theories in Jane Austen’s novels, writing at The Atlantic, Shannon Chamberlain gets back to the topic, this time debating what influence fiction had, and in particular the emerging genre of the novel, in Smith’s production: “Perhaps this sense of turmoil, of progress that could still be undone, […]

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Cents and Sensibility

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While readers today might think of Jane Austen novels as the equivalent of 18th century bodice rippers, money, wealth, and economics played a major role both in their creation and in their narrative. Austen wrote as much for financial benefit as for art. Her characters, meanwhile, are as much interested in financial solvency as they […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Corinne Goria

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Author and veteran Voice of Witness editor Peter Orner sits down with Invisible Hands: Voices From the Global Economy editor Corinne Goria to talk about putting the book together, economic interdependency, and the complex human stories behind everyday items.

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The Rumpus Interview with Astra Taylor

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Driven by philosophical thought, Astra Taylor—documentary filmmaker, activist, and writer—looks at the way the Internet has affected social and economic change in her new book, The People’s Platform: Taking Back Power and Culture in the Digital Age.

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Economists Set Phasers on Stun

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Nobel prize winning economist and NYT‘s columnist, Paul Krugman expresses his love for sci-fi and fantasy in an interview for Wired magazine. Krugman cites Isaac Asimov’s novel Foundation as his inspiration for becoming an economist, a damned responsible one at that: “‘I read [Isaac Asimov’s] Foundation back when I was in high school, when I […]

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“What Isn’t for Sale?”

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At The Atlantic, philosopher Michael J. Sandel breaks down the hidden (or not so hidden) costs of a culture in which almost everything is for sale, and articulates the key distinction between a market economy and a market society. “…Some of the good things in life are degraded if turned into commodities. So to decide […]

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Flexible Working

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A British thinktank, the New Economics Foundation, is advocating for a shorter work week as a cure for Britain’s economic, social, and environmental woes. The economists argue that the solution to fewer jobs due to technological advances involves work-sharing, and a government legislated maximum work week. “Are we just living to work, and working to […]

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Deconstructing Debt

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In this interview economic anthropologist David Graeber disputes the standard theory that the monetary system replaces the barter system, arguing that credit and debt come before money. Graeber sheds light on the complex relationship between debt and morality, transitions from commodity to virtual money, and the relative importance of money versus debt, before dipping into […]

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Economics for Kids

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Children’s books are teaching all kinds of lessons and not just the morals-heavy, value-driven ones that are meant to stave off latent delinquency. Read between the lines of children’s lit and you can brush up on some conceptual economics. One can begin to understand  economic efficiency by reading Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type, or […]

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Inauspicious News For Our Economy

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The whole system of American outsourcing has rendered our industry incapable of producing the next technological innovation, which unfortunately is the key to reconstructing our economy. One example of this is the Kindle. Amazon doesn’t have the means for the next generation of their techy product to be produced on domestic soil. This article sources […]

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Megatrends Now and Later

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It seems like every year there are economic predictions and warnings about the impending doom that is coming or the next big thing to look out for, but what became of these megatrends? It turns out many of them lack the follow through. Heralding an impending, sustainable economic boom, the rise of Japan as a […]

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The Limits of NGOs

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Internationally, labor unions have a weaker presence. Making up for this slack are the non-governmental organizations that support health initiatives, women’s rights and ebb environmental degradation, etc. The presence of NGOs internationally, even with a history of positive consequences, have been facing governmental tensions over dealing with controversial issues, like food security or anti-corruption activist […]

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Creating Jobs

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The Atlantic discusses job creation in both words and graphs. Derek Thompson breaks down the problem, explains where the jobs are hiding and tells us how we can grow, economically. “Finally, there is the innovation conundrum. Calling for more innovation doesn’t mean inviting the 25 MacArthur Grant Fellows into a room and asking them to […]

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