Posts Tagged: Film

Safety Nets: On Seeing Movies with My Children

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There’s no blueprint for any of this. If there were, I would have read it by now. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #71: Kris D’Agostino

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In Kris D’Agostino’s second novel, The Antiques, he returns to familiar forms: A dysfunctional family whose members are in various stages of arrested development; a generational home in upstate New York; and the absurdity of life in its most darkly comedic moments.

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The Rumpus Interview with Tobias Carroll

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Tobias Carroll discusses his newest collection Transitory, the influence of film on his writing, and getting good news at bad times. ...more

The Future of Body Horror: Can Our Art Keep up with Our Suffering?

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The individuality of body horror is its signature attribute. Nothing is more intimate than one’s own body, and by extension, one’s own physical suffering. ...more

The Rumpus Review of La La Land

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Fantasy needs reality “because it’s only with the real backdrop that it works at all,” and reality needs fantasy to challenge its façade ...more

Macho Prey: Homophobia and Unlikely Victims in Tickled

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The film only grazes the issue, but homophobia is the fuel of the harassment that the targets face. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #58: James Steven Sadwith

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A self-described “actor’s director,” James Steven Sadwith has been writing, directing, and producing television movies, miniseries, and dramas for nearly three decades—and is perhaps best known for his work on the lives of Frank Sinatra and Elvis. But for Coming through the Rye, his first feature film for the big screen, Sadwith comes closer to home, chronicling in fictional form the journey he himself embarked upon as a youth.

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The Rumpus Review of Nate Parker’s The Birth of a Nation

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Parker set out to bring a different kind of “slavery movie” to audiences. And it is different. ...more

Portrait of an Actress

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In an article for the New Yorker, Richard Brody writes about the newly restored 1967 film by Hans-Jürgen Syberberg, Romy: Anatomy of a Face. The film “offers an intimate view of the actress Romy Schneider, revealing crucial conflicts behind the image of a public figure who loomed large in the German national imagination—and within the art of movies itself” and will be shown during the Museum of Modern Art’s “To Save and Project” film festival this month.

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Rising Above the Rink: Remembering Bill Nunn

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In those little moments, a higher truth emerges from above the rink: with some humor, peace becomes more possible. ...more

The Rumpus Review of Bridget Jones’s Baby

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Perhaps Bridget fans who watched the movies but never read the books might not find this movie to be such a hard blow... But those who read the books—and those who loved the pilgrim soul in Bridget—will feel the loss more keenly. ...more

The Rumpus Review of The Light Between Oceans

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I wanted so badly to invest in the characters, to cry and feel their pain, but I felt detached. ...more

Sound & Vision #25: Brendan Toller

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Allyson McCabe talks with Brendan Toller about his love of vinyl records, buying music in local stores, and his latest documentary film Danny Says, an examination of publicist and manager Danny Fields. ...more

The Rumpus Review of One More Time with Feeling

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“We didn’t ask for it,” Cave begins another poetic flight, and again we think he’s talking about something ghastly, “but it’s all around us, a gratuitous beauty.” ...more

California Tales

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San Francisco filmmaker Jenni Olson has just released her new film, a cinematic essay titled The Royal Road. Made up of historical research material and lyrical, personal monologues, the film is “a primer on Junipero Serra’s Spanish colonization of California and the Mexican American War alongside intimate reflections on nostalgia, the pursuit of unavailable women, butch identity and Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo—all against a contemplative backdrop of 16mm urban California landscapes, and featuring a voiceover cameo by Tony Kushner.”

Head over to Vimeo to see the entire movie, and watch the trailer after the jump!

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After Adderall: It’s Playing Everywhere

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After Adderall, a Rumpus-produced movie written and directed (and starring) Rumpus Founder and Editor-in-Chief Stephen Elliott, has been getting some great write-ups. And it’s probably playing somewhere near you very soon!

September 12, 2016, Brooklyn: The Brooklyn Book Festival @ Videology 308 Bedford
September 14, 2016, Columbus Ohio: Gateway Film Center

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The Rumpus Mini-Review of The Lost Arcade

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In the past couple of years it has become nearly impossible to avoid a certain genre of New York documentary that can best be described as urban eulogy. But The Lost Arcade, directed by Kurt Vincent and written by Irene Chin, isn’t just another wistful goodbye to the dirty boulevards of pre-gentrification New York.

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Time Risk in Hollywood

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Screenwriters do the bulk of their work prior to the green light. Cameras not rolling. Trying to get films made. They toil at the wrong end of the time risk curve, taking on time risk in a myriad of forms. 

In a column for Wordplay, screenwriter Terry Rossio explores the notion of “time risk” as it relates to “the power structure of Hollywood”— i.e., the relationship between screenwriters, producers, directors, actors, and agents.

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Florence Foster Jenkins, Meryl Streep, and White Feminism

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Streep’s career encapsulates the mid-to-late 20th century ideal of American whiteness as aspirational and as attainable. ...more

The Rumpus Review of Seoul Searching

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Seeing is a critical part of normalizing, and though it seems like a rudimentary expectation, it’s important for American audiences to see Korean-Americans simply living their lives. ...more

Friendless Female Sex Workers

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Not only are these characters destined to die in the cautionary tales and to endure marriages to self-congratulatory men in the redemptions tales, they don’t even have anyone to miss them when they succumb to these fates

At Hazlitt, Alana Massey writes about the baseless trope in films of the depraved and friendless female sex worker needing to be saved by a strong male client, and the poisonous quality it has in an age after movies like Magic Mike and My Own Private Idaho have told the stories of male sex workers in supportive and communal ways.

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