Posts Tagged: Fitzgerald

Paris and All That Jazz

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While Fitzgerald’s haunts have certainly evolved over the years, and some have disappeared altogether, visitors to Paris can still relive the old-fashioned glamor of Fitzgerald’s Paris. It requires imagination, champagne, and a touch of despair.  In an article for Travel + Leisure, Jess McHugh writes about the Paris of F. Scott Fitzgerald, and how visitors […]

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Conversations with Writers Braver than Me: Anne Roiphe

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Anne Roiphe on respecting writers’ freedom to express the truth of their experiences, while also respecting their subjects’ prerogative to shun them for it.

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Retracing Steps

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Like so many silenced publications before them, Esquire has gone the way of the ear with a new Classics podcast that unearths articles from the magazine’s illustrious eighty-year history. In their latest installment, Rumpus friend and contributor Nick Flynn discusses a series of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s essays published in 1936. Listen here.

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The Creative Writing Class That Changed My Life

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One could sense this passion in all of us. It seemed to fill the classroom as if it were part of the oxygen.

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Ladies Drink Free

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Whether glamorized or pitied, the figure of the alcoholic writer has long been a subject of cultural fascination. Having written a book on the usual suspects—Hemingway, Fitzgerald, et al.—Olivia Laing asks the unfortunately necessary follow-up question: okay, but what about the women? At the Guardian, she explores female writers’s reasons for drinking, as well as society’s tendency to […]

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The Loneliest Art

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Does screenwriting qualify as “real” writing? Over at the New Yorker, Richard Brody wonders what F. Scott Fitzgerald’s failed shot at Hollywood reveals about film as an industry and as an art: Fitzgerald was undone by his screenwriting-is-writing mistake. It’s a notion that has its basis in artistic form. Look at Fitzgerald’s books: they are […]

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Jay Gatsby’s Back

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Jay McInerney explains why the American classic The Great Gatsby, the last book that Hannah Kingsley-Ma and Kate Geiselman loved, is making a resurgence this year. After all, Jimmy Gatz “invents a hero called Jay Gatsby and then inhabits this creation, just as we hope to reinvent ourselves, some day, any day now, almost certainly starting tomorrow.”

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