Posts Tagged: full stop

Rediscovering Amber Reeves

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For Full Stop, Emma Schneider reviews a recently republished book: Amber Reeves’s 1914 novel A Lady and Her Husband, which Schneider aligns with “American pre-war feminist classics such as The Awakening and The Yellow Wallpaper.” Reeves’s novel offers a comparatively more practical look at the emergence of pre-feminist concerns at the turn of the 20th […]

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The Writer’s Voice on Social Media

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Voice is not a commodity but the slow accretion of individual perspective. This is a writer’s most valuable asset… Social media isn’t a distraction from the seriousness of what he’s published. It’s an affirmation of his argument’s importance. Authors today face a unique situation: the presence of social media fueling society’s profound hunger for transparency […]

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Reality, Fiction, Everything in Between

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In such a world, the trajectory of any one character, however prominent, never escapes being warped by the gravity of another. Even if, as in Preparation for the Next Life, these background figures are no longer alive. Just as marginalization cannot reduce them to zeroes, neither do destruction and disappearance…. At Full Stop, Maxwell Donnewald writes […]

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The Poetic Power of Pedestrians

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By merely wandering, the dérivist frustrates the spatial logic of capitalism, in the process discovering new currents, fissures, and vortices of possibility within a deeply familiar space. Wandering and drifting have long been championed as means of inspiration, but how does that figure into the politics and configuration of our literature? Over at Full Stop, […]

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Live-Tweeting Grief

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“The challenge of memorializing doesn’t favor professionals,” writes Sean Minogue over at Full Stop. So, how are autobiographical narratives of loss by Karl Ove Knausgaard, Joan Didion, or Paul Auster different from therapeutic journaling? Minogue takes a look at how these authors express the everyday details of living after a loss, and how new forms […]

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Following Ulysses

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To what extent am I reading Ulysses by following Ulysses Reader? What does “reading” even mean at this point, given our near-constant engagement with text? Over at Full Stop, Dustin Illingworth describes his relationship with Ulysses Reader, a Twitter account posting the entire text of James Joyce’s Ulysses, 140 characters at a time.

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Go Ahead, Break Some Grammar Rules

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It’s actually the opposite. Most people break grammar rules so they can be more precise. For Full Stop, Catie Disabato writes about prescriptive vs. descriptive grammar, and why “bad” grammar can be a good thing. Her data points include Burger King ads, John Dryden’s seventeenth-century grammar campaigns, and use of the word “because” as a […]

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I Internet, Therefore I am!

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What defines a person’s existence? A photo ID or their Internet activity? It’s a question that has been losing its irony lately. There’s the news of a traveling couple that allegedly went missing in Perú but in actuality was just taking a break from Facebook updates. And Full Stop has us thinking about the former pop […]

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Wright’s Anna Karenina: Noble Failure?

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Amanda Shubert’s essay “Love in Excess: Joe Wright’s Anna Karenina” takes two of Wright’s film adaptations, Pride and Prejudice (2005) and Atonement (2007), and perceptively compares and contrasts them to Anna Karenina (2012). According to Shubert, Anna Karenina is a “mess” compared to Wright’s two previous film adaptations. Shubert claims:

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No Animals We Could Name

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At Full Stop, Ben Jahn reviews Ted Sanders’ new story collection, No Animals We Could Name. The collection, as the title suggests, often skirts the foggy line between the imaginary and the observed, and, for Jahn, challenges the possibility of recounting sensations as truly observed: “A kind of celebratory regret runs through these stories for the simultaneous […]

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Don’t “Do” Rome

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At Full Stop, Stephanie Bernhard writes about why we shouldn’t “do” cities. “To suggest that a city or site can be “done,” like dishes, the laundry, or homework, reduces said city to the limits of the do-er’s consciousness or experience.”

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On Gender Bias and Identity Lit

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At Full Stop, Stephanie Bernhard weighs in on the literary gender imbalance, arguing that today’s literary marketplace is “identity-driven,” which makes it more difficult for women writers to succeed. “Our culture still offers men a broader spectrum of acceptable personality types than it does women. Wolitzer quotes poet Katha Pollitt saying ‘For every one woman, […]

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“Conversations with Pauline Kael”

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At Full Stop, Amanda Shubert reviews Brian Kellow’s Pauline Kael: A Life in the Dark, while interrogating the particularly vitriolic (and often gendered) criticism that continues to be leveled against the influential film critic. “Kael spoke to people in a voice they recognized, but she demanded something more from them than they were accustomed to. […]

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Full Stop Goes to AWP

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“So here it is: the trade secrets, the panels and moments we kept bringing back up over meals — really, everything that inspired us to discuss hotel arrangements for the 2013 AWP in Boston on our El ride home.” Full Stop went to AWP and created an illustrated run-down of their favorite parts. The Rumpus […]

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Repaired Circuits

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“If we can find birds on the pages of books, and gods within concrete, it does not seem fantastic to encounter our parents inside of their pots and patios.” At Full Stop, Peter Nowogrodzki takes a close look at Tan Lin’s The Patio and The Index while reflecting on resurrections and circularity.

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Aimee Bender on The Situation in American Writing

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Aimee Bender responds to Full Stop’s Situation in American Writing survey. Bender discusses literary criticism’s transition to the Internet, the political tendencies of American writing, and whether she imagines a specific audience for her work: “No, not a definite audience. Whoever responds to the work! Whoever catches (more or less) the ball I threw. My […]

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Roxane Gay on The Situation in American Writing

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“The Situation in American writing,” Full Stop’s questionnaire for prominent authors—with questions ranging from literary criticism to war—elicits some excellent responses from Roxane Gay. “My writing is lots of things but more often than not, the stories and essays I write reflect an allegiance to women and the concerns of women. A lot of my […]

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