Posts Tagged: last poem i loved

The Last Poem I Loved: “So the Pilot Says Over the Intercom” by David Hernandez

By

July fifth. My girlfriend and I are waiting on Chinese food to be delivered while the neighborhood kids work their way through buckets of excess firecrackers and I come across a book I thought I’d lost—Always Danger by David Hernandez, a slick little volume with combusting matches on the cover. Pretty much every other page […]

...more

The Last Poem I Loved: “Oh Karma, Dharma, pudding and pie” by Philip Appleman

By

Of all of the people I know who own a smartphone (a majority, anymore), most of them get up in the morning and immediately reach for said smartphone from their cozy nest in bed. The first thing they do is check Facebook and/or Twitter, or they check the news and post links to news stories […]

...more

The Last Poem I Loved: “Sleeping Lioness” by Larry Levis

By

As a fiction writer, and as a reader, I gravitate toward stories from the perspective of a specific, imperfect and alert, outward-and-inward-looking consciousness, a transparent eyeball with legs and, at least occasionally, uncomfortable shoes. The danger of a story centered around the drama of attention and understanding—of a character trying to see and not only […]

...more

The Last Poem I Loved: “The Crowds Cheered as Gloom Galloped Away” by Matthea Harvey

By

Matthea Harvey’s “The Crowds Cheered As Gloom Galloped Away” resides in her second full-length collection, the wonderfully-titled Sad Little Breathing Machine. It is a poem about ponies, sadness, and the inversion of cognitive behavioral therapy. It is a poem about pills, the surprising delicateness of rodents’ palates, and the psychological benefits of a day at […]

...more

The Last Poem I Loved: “South America” by Tom Raworth

By

Can words become a part of you? I found Tom Raworth’s “South America” published in Keith Tuma’s Anthology of Twentieth-Century British & Irish Poetry (Oxford, 2001) and have always looked back. Listen to Raworth read it. It asks us to hunt much of the big game that is compelling and maddening in poetry: complex, searching […]

...more