Posts Tagged: MariNaomi

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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Thanksgiving is still three weeks away, but it’s never too early to express our gratitude. MariNaomi shows us how it’s done with a concise list of the things she is thankful for, which includes “the tenacity of young me, who kept at it for so long.”

An excerpt from writer and cartoonist John Dermot Woods’s new “illustrated compendium,” The Baltimore Atrocities, brims with macabre mysteries.

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Thankful

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There is an abundance of sadness on the Internet about how hard it is to be an artist, a writer, a cartoonist, a woman, queer, a person of color, etc. I understand that people want to express their frustration, but as a person who is all of these things and more, it can get really discouraging.

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The Lowdown on Queer Feminist Comics

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“Sexuality is more than gay and straight, and probably even more than LGBTQIA. Comics are here to help.” So read the delightful subhed for Greg Baldino’s LARB review of two anthologies of comics about gender and sexuality.

The books are The Big Feminist But and Anything That Loves, and though he’s frustrated by certain limitations, he also finds much to praise, including a comic by our very own MariNaomi.

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“It Happened To Me” Aftermath

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Rumpus cartoonist MariNaomi wrote a powerful essay at XOJane about being sexually harassed during a comic convention panel.

“This isn’t the first time this has happened to me. Years ago, at another comic convention, a fellow panelist blatantly looked me up and down and said it was “getting hot in here” — onstage, humiliated in full view of an audience of hundreds.

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Drawn Out Stories: Comic Book Art and Artists

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This Sunday, October 7th, the San Francisco Contemporary Jewish Museum will be hosting Drawn Out Stories: Comic Book Art and Artists, an event that features Rumpus comics editor Paul Madonna, along with contributors MariNaomi and Chelsea Martin:

“Whether used as a vehicle for self-exploration, a way to take up a political platform, or a means to reinterpret fine art, comic strips are now a genre as sophisticated as the short story or novel.

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