Posts Tagged: Native American

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: The Diggins

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I was told that I was “a good digger” if I was behaving as a young child, working hard, and not talking back. Like nursery rhymes, the rhythm of racism cannot be forgotten. ...more

All Writing Is Political: A Conversation with Mohsin Hamid

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Mohsin Hamid discusses his new novel, Exit West, hope in fiction as a form of resistance, the necessity of learning to accept social change, and how much America and Pakistan have come to resemble each other. ...more

Saturday Rumpus Poetry: A Poem-Review of Milk Black Carbon and Whereas

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And in the silence of the night the small sound of small feet making their way into words. ...more

The Dark Heart of America: On David Grann’s Killers of the Flower Moon

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David Grann's new book Killers of the Flower Moon explores the 1920s murders of the Osage tribe, the making of the FBI, and is a reminder of the all too recent history of betrayals that comprise America’s dark heart. ...more

The Rumpus Saturday Essay: The Savage Mind, Pt. 3

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To deny violence is to do it. Our surprise at Sandy Hook and Cold Springs and Columbine is a form of violence in its own right. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: The Savage Mind, Pt. 2

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There isn’t even a discussion. There aren’t any words. You just start swinging—the building is a fence, your cousins are a fence. The two of you are surrounded. There’s no escape for either of you. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: The Savage Mind, Pt. 1

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The violence came in and we were not just in danger of being victims of it. We were in danger of being violent ourselves. ...more

Corinne Lee and Finding an Antidote to America’s Toxicity

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Poet Corinne Lee on writing her epic book-length poem Plenty and finding new ways to live in a rapidly changing world. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Melissa Febos

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Melissa Febos discusses Abandon Me, confessional writing, Billie Holiday, reenacting trauma, cataloguing narratives, and searching for identity. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: The Living Wound

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Ancestors need a scratch, a stretch sometimes, too. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Nádleehí: One Who Changes

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I am scared. I will continue to be scared. I am scared that, one day, I will not be able to run as fast as my dad who eluded rocks and a tire iron. ...more

14 Possibilities of Native Poetry

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Natalie Diaz, Featured Guest Editor for the January edition of Connotation Press, has curated a portfolio titled “14 Possibilities of Native Poetry.” In her introduction she poses the question, What is Native poetry?, and then responds:

What is Native poetry means there can be infinite possibilities, infinite poets and their infinite poems who might be an answer.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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First, Ruby Hansen Murray explores the surreal landscapes of historic Native American locations turned educational tourist hotspots in the Saturday Rumpus Essay, as she journeys with the Osage Nation Historical Preservation Department to Cahokia, the site of an ancient agrarian culture in now-Illinois, among camera-carrying tourists and young field-trippers.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Walk On

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As writers, we must write it out. Tear off the veils and air the rotting fruits. ...more

This Week in Essays

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Here at The Rumpus, this essay by Liz Latty on challenging the fairy tale myth of adoption is receiving a tremendous response from readers.

Malloy Owen has written a mind-opening essay for The Point providing a valuable perspective that challenges liberals to reexamine liberalism.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Pain Scale Treaties

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Perched on the shoulders of generational trauma sit these two theses: suffering begets cruelty begets suffering begets cruelty, and pain is empathy’s catalyst. ...more

Writing Beyond the Quota

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When the mainstream doesn’t carve out space for their work, writers must take the situation to their own hands, creating their own platforms, even their own communities of dedicated readers. Over at Electric Literature, Adrian L. Jawort discusses the process of compiling two anthologies of contemporary Native American and Indigenous writing:

The anthologies are about how we view the world as we know it and share it to other indigenous peoples through the lens of our own creative control; not what perhaps some so-called Big Five New York publisher or outside editor assumes the Native experience should read like because maybe they’ve previously read Louise Erdrich, other Alexie works, or an aforementioned Native American Renaissance-era book from decades ago and deduced that Native American literature representation had already been fulfilled.

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