Posts Tagged: rape

The Rise and Fall of Alt Lit

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The Alt Lit community brought together a disparate group of writers and poets from the sorts of backgrounds often ignored by mainstream literary fiction, leveraging the Internet and building a loyal and dedicated following. Then this fall, allegations of a history of rape, sexual abuse, and misogyny within the community exploded across the Internet.

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The Rumpus Saturday Essay: Stain

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It’s hard to remember why I was silent. Maybe, like some of the women only now reporting they were raped by Bill Cosby decades ago, I was afraid I wouldn’t be believed.

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Good Victims

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We couldn’t remember his name.
We couldn’t remember what he looked like.
We couldn’t remember how many there were.
We changed our story as we began to remember more details.
We changed our story into something we could live with.

As Rolling Stone’s article about rape at the University of Virginia continues to be torn apart, Rumpus Essays Editor Emeritus Roxane Gay writes about the problem of expecting survivors of sexual assault to be models of excellence, to get all the facts right, to have fought hard enough, to be, as she terms it, “good victims.”

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The Stockholm Syndrome of Sexual Assault

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For SlateAmanda Hess examines yet another first-person confessional: sexual assault victim Jenny Kutner’s essay “The Other Side of the Story,” published in  Texas Monthly.

The power of Kutner’s story is that it lends insight into a particular type of victimization—the kind that happens when the victim doesn’t see herself as one.

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“No Offense”

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Poet and Twitter personality Patricia Lockwood has an intensely good (and just plain intense) poem up The Awl.

It’s called “Rape Joke,” and it starts like this:

The rape joke is that you were 19 years old.

The rape joke is that he was your boyfriend.

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“A Tragedy of Choice”

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But for those of us who didn’t have a choice, those of us who survived the choices of men who violated our bodies, those of us who defend ourselves everyday, those of us who are still trying to figure out what does and doesn’t make us a real victim, tears aren’t enough to make us wish you didn’t have to pay.

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We Still Have A Long Way to Go

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A grim reminder of one of the reasons we still need things like International Women’s Day: the suggestion that men should take responsibility for not raping women is apparently outrageous.

At Salon, Mary Elizabeth Williams tells the story of Zerlina Maxwell, who appeared on Sean Hannity’s show to say, “If you train men not to grow up to become rapists, you prevent rape.” The sadly predictable result: “I can’t even go on my Facebook page,” says Maxwell.

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Holy Orange

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Years later, Bombay is still fresh in my mind and in my bones. As a visitor, I was naïve and lost. When I hear bells, I still see statues of Ganesh in a cool, stone temple and smell sandalwood incense.

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Kissa Yoni Ka: What The Vagina Monologues Mean In Hindi

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As reports of the utterly horrifying rape and death of a woman in Delhi have made clear, India, like most countries, can be a dangerous place for women.

In a guest post for Racialicious, Hannah Green uses an Indian performance of The Vagina Monologues as a jumping-off point for ruminations on sexual assault and women’s rights, in both India and the US.

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Eleven

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We don’t know how to talk about children anymore. We get so wrapped up in these shallow narratives about children being preternaturally advanced, about little girls wearing make up and dressing provocatively and seducing the camera, about little girls maturing faster, developing sooner. We forget.

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The City of Joy

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“This is not rape as people in the West understand it. This is a weapon of war, a deliberate strategy designed to destroy our communities by leaving our women disabled and ostracised from their families and neighbours.”– Dr. Denis Mukwege, a Congolese doctor who treats rape victims and is helping to build a place called “The City of Joy,” a town especially built for women to “heal, rebuild and learn new skills to take out into the world again.”

You should really, really read this article.

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