Posts by: Jill Schepmann

This Week in Short Fiction

By

On Tuesday, Margaret Atwood released Stone Mattress, a collection of “wonderfully weird short stories.” Stone Mattress is Atwood’s eighth collection of stories, not to mention her 14 novels and other formidable volumes of poetry, children’s literature, and nonfiction. Reviewers across the boards are heralding this most recent work as “wise, sharp,” and “rich.” Let’s look at […]

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

On Tuesday, Guernica published “Walking on Water,” an excerpt from Payem Faeli’s 2010 novella, I Will Grow, I Will Bear Fruit… Figs. In this excerpt, translated into English by Sarah Khalili, Faeli provides a meditative taste of the novella’s wandering narrator, a young boy in search of a name. You can see Faeli’s impulse toward […]

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

It seems impossible to say that someone was quietly assembling a story collection over a decade and a half when they’ve been publishing each of the stories one by one over at a little place called The New Yorker. And yet, that appears to be exactly what Donald Antrim has done. Farrar Strauss and Giroux […]

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

On Tuesday, Tony Earley released a new collection of stories, Mr. Tall. Two decades have passed since Earley’s debut collection, Here We Are in Paradise, and though he has released two novels and a memoir since that time, for short fiction addicts (and lovers of southern writing), the publication of a new book of stories is […]

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

As civil servants in heavily militarized gear keep the Ferguson community under surveillance and the rest of us glued to the Internet for increasingly shocking reports of brutality and awe, we need another good story this week. Enter the Coffee House Press Black Arts Movement Series. The series is dedicated to giving new life to […]

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

The news of Michael Brown’s death cannot be ignored. When one of our young people dies from shots fired by a police officer, there will be sadness and confusion. There will inevitably be questions, and questions left unanswered will lead to anger.  This is a week, perhaps, when we need fiction and art to help […]

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

Leesa Cross-Smith’s debut story collection, Every Kiss a War, dropped last week from Mojave River Press. Written in the second person, her incantatory response reads like a spiritual to-do list, almost a story in itself. Try a sip: Drink red wine, cold. Buy cheap beer and sparklers. Wear a skirt and cowboy boots. Kiss in an empty […]

...more

1

This Week in Short Fiction

By

Playing off of Jerry Seinfeld’s video series, “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee,” The Morning News introduced a new column earlier this month called “Novelists in Restaurants Eating Food.” Roxane Gay offered up the first sampling, and this Wednesday, Jami Attenburg contributed the second, “Café de la Esquina.” Should there be doubts as to the genre of the review/not review, the editors […]

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

Let’s dedicate this week to the publications, editors, and benevolent marketing gurus who unleashed a whole bunch of quality FREE short fiction to us. Under the shadow of the FCC’s impending decision as to whether or not net neutrality will continue, these all-you-can-read buffets taste even sweeter. Read on for one potential menu of all […]

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

On Monday, Cloud Atlas author David Mitchell began tweeting a short story called “The Right Sort” in multiple daily installments, compiled by Sceptre Books, readable from the top down. Set to conclude today, the story takes the Valium-filtered perspective of a young teen in 1970s England. BBC Radio 4 spoke with Mitchell, who only recently joined Twitter, […]

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

Coming off the holiday weekend, the trusted dispensary of short fiction, Joyland, published “The History of Hanging Out” by Kevin Mandel. Mandel’s story lives up to its title, encapsulating the bundled, sparking energies of a group of young creators. If you’ve ever started a band or a literary magazine, you’ll recognize yourself and your gang in this […]

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

On Monday, ZYZZYVA announced the release of Strange Attraction: The Best Ten Years of Zyzzyva, an anthology of fiction, essays, poetry, and dramas published during the journal’s early years (1985–1994) under the leadership of founding editor and legend Howard Junker. A few weeks ago, ZYZZYVA celebrated publishing its 100th issue, and the pub will turn 30 next […]

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

Monday marked Bloomsday, the annual celebration of James Joyce’s 732-page day-in-a-book, Ulysses. While this is hardly short fiction, Joyce is also often credited as one of the earliest practitioners of the epiphany, a technique that still burns bright in short fiction (and at times too bright as some have told it). As a toast to […]

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

There’s a chance you’ll hear Peter Ho Davies read the first sentence of his story “Chance” and you’ll be hooked. There’s also a chance you won’t, but either way, it’s worth a visit to Drum, the “literary magazine for your ears” that publishes audio of writers reading their fiction, essays, and interviews.  This week, you […]

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

In this, the first week of June, a band of storytellers joined hands and exhaled sweet stories that rolled out like a giant park full of empty hammocks waiting to hold readers through the long summer days… For example: On Tuesday, poet-storyteller Stuart Dybek released not one, but two short story collections: Ecstatic Cahoots: Fifty […]

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

The Los Angeles Review of Books enlisted Kayla Williams, a veteran sergeant and Arabic linguist, to compile a list of war narratives by women for Memorial Day. Williams, herself an accomplished writer of two memoirs on her war experience and return home, offered a wealth of resources for those wanting to know more about American […]

...more

This Week in Short Fiction

By

May is Short Story Month! In honor of StoryADay’s second annual celebration, Flavorwire writers offered their recommendations of five stories worth a read, from Calvino to O’Connor. On Monday, Gawker held a live-chat interview with Rivka Galchen about her new short story collection, American Innovations. All 10 of the stories in the collection are told […]

...more