Posts by: M. Rebekah Otto

Ten Walks/Two Talks

By

Over at HTMLGIANT Adam Robinson interviewed Jon Cotner and Andy Fitch about their genre-defying book, Ten Walks/Two Talks:  “It manages to combine a generalized, dog-like happiness with an adult awareness of death.” There is even a chance to win a copy of the book thanks to a walk-off contest! Click here to learn more, and […]

...more

The Revealer on National Prayer Day

By

The Revealer, loosely affiliated with the Center for Religion and Media at NYU and Killing the Buddha, covers “religion in the news and the news about religion.” An article about National Prayer Day yesterday examines the evolution of the holiday, from Washington to Lincoln. You never knew prayer could be so twisted.

...more

if:book

By

The Institute for the Future of the Book “investigates the evolution of intellectual discourse as it shifts from printed pages to networked screens.” As you may have noticed, here at the Rumpus, we’re pretty interested in that too. We, though, still very much believe in the printed page, while it seems that the Institute for […]

...more

Bruno: Activist or Stereotype?

By

Bruno, the flamboyantly gay Austrain fashion reporter played by Sacha Baron Cohen, has a feature length film. Due to many wild premiers – from bull-fighting in Madrid to dressing as a Buckingham Palace guard in London –  and a unique stunt with Eminem at the MTV Movie Awards, The Bruno Movie has already earned much […]

...more

Terra Naomi

By

Terra Naomi, a friend of The Rumpus, just released a new song, Vicodin, online for free. Professionally trained in opera at the University of Michigan, the Internet propelled Terra to fame. Three years ago, Naomi’s YouTube music videos went viral – her low-key DIY video Say It’s Possible has over three million views!

...more

Scott Carrier

By

After hitchhiking from Salt Lake City to NPR’s national office, Scott Carrier became a unique radio producer, interviewing schizophrenics and amnesiacs. Here is a This American Life episode dedicated to his stories. He has also worked extensively with Hearing Voices. Years ago, after Carrier’s first book came out, Salon posted an interesting interview with him.

...more

The Daily Dish

By

Andrew Sullivan , one of the most popular bloggers in the world, is a bundle of contradictions – gay, conservative, Catholic. Though British (and Oxford-educated), Sullivan now writes primarily about American politics from his base at The Atlantic in D.C. Most notably, though, he is not partisan. Passionate, yes. He supports the war in Iraq […]

...more

Scram Magazine

By

Scram, started by Kim Cooper in 1992, is a magazine “dedicated to unpopular culture.” They have some blogs, and they also have published a few books. They “chronicle the neglected, the odd, the nifty and the nuts.” So, we’re comrades. Also, Cooper wrote a book for 33 1/3 on Neutral Milk Hotel’s In the Aeroplane […]

...more

Music on the Internet?

By

Last December in their annual music issue, Oxford American lamented the demise of music criticism. But nonetheless here’s a collection of music related internet findings: Douglas Wolk discusses The Celestial Jukebox. A Cultural Dictionary of Punk (doesn’t punk, by nature, evade definition?). This blog catalogs library music, as in music found in libraries. Also, Sasha […]

...more

2

American Short Stories

By

A.O. Scott gives a nice shout out to the craft of American short stories in the New York Times, particularly praising, Flannery O’Connor, John Cheever, and Donald Barthelme. For more on Cheever, Slate ran a review of his newest biography. If the article piques your interest about Barthelme, check out McSweeney’s 24 with a special […]

...more

Zoetrope: The Latin American Issue

By

Zoetrope: All-Story published their Latin American Issue this Spring, edited by Daniel Alarcón and Diego Trelles Paz. Read an interview with Alarcón on the arbitrary nature of anthologies and the “outdated lens of magical realism.”

...more

The House of Wigs

By

“The diary of a copywriter, written on company time, billed to the client.” The House of Wigs is a small collection of sixty admirable short stories from the folks at Fireland. This collection renews my faith in what reading will become.

...more

Pimp This Bum

By

As Amazon, eBay, and the 2008 Presidential election demonstrated, the Internet is a great revenue stream. Well, two guys out of Houston (Sean and Kevin Dolan) decided to harness its power for the benefit of the homeless – at least for the benefit of one homeless man, Tim Edwards.

...more

1

The Garden of Eden

By

Pretty quietly back in 1994 archaeologists found huge stone carvings buried in Turkey. About the size of the boulders at Stonehenge, these unique rocks are more than 10,000 year older than those of Stonehenge, dating to about 11-12,000 years ago. The rocks depict paradisaical figures of birds, lions and flowering trees. These stones have also […]

...more

Eliza Doolittle in the White House

By

In her essay “Speaking in Tongues” in The New York Review of Books, February 26, 2009, Zadie Smith examines Barack Obama’s doubleness, not just his biracial genetic history but how he inhabits multiple voices. She reviews his first book Dreams From My Father and sees him as an artist as much as a politician, but […]

...more

1

I Hate to Make My Bed

By

In A Jury of Her Peers, Elaine Showalter chronicles the history of female American writers, from captivity narratives to Annie Proulx. Salon calls her “the woman for the job” due to her 1978 book A Literature of Their Own: British Woman Novelists from Bronte to Lessing. One of the founders of feminist literary criticism, Showalter […]

...more

Save the Words

By

Though once upon a time Noah Webster wrote a dictionary to reflect the ever growing and changing language of American English, the Oxford English Dictionary does regularly update their logs to include such words as “bootylicious” and “MILF” – terms definitely in everyday use but not requiring etymological analysis. Dictionaries, also, remove words that have […]

...more

The Last Book Party

By

So, where is the publishing industry going? No one really knows. But we like to speculate. For the March issue of Harper’s Gideon Lewis-Kraus covered the annual Frankfurt Book Fair, what he called “the last book party.” Read an interview about the article here. (Lewis-Kraus must like to review literary conferences as he did in […]

...more

1

J.G. Ballard’s Pre-posthumous Memoir

By

After eighteen novels and even more short story collections, J. G. Ballard directly approaches autobiography in his latest book Miracles of Life. (Read the London Guardian review here.) Though known for his dystopian science fiction, Ballard analyzes his own life with some surprisingly similar tools, principally Freud. LAWeekly labeled the book a “pre-posthumous memoir” because […]

...more

You Never Knew It Could Be Like This

By

Koert van Mensvoort is transforming the Internet and the culture around it. A Dutch artist and professor, Mensvoort challenges how we experience the world around us, especially, but not only, the digital world. His Web site asks: “Why not start a new renaissance right now?” But when he says it, the question is rhetorical because […]

...more

Reading Online

By

Fact: The Internet changes how we read. But is reading on the internet not really “reading” at all? In a recent column in The New York Times Virginia Heffernan analyzes how her three year old son “reads” on Starfall, a website designed to teach young children to read. (Starfall, by the way, is the first […]

...more

1

Private Sector Detention

By

Last week Pennsylvania judge Mark A. Ciavarella Jr. plead guilty to illegally prosecuting minors, in order to get kickbacks from privately-run juvenile detention centers. Children were sentenced to three months incarceration for making fun of their teachers on MySpace. The judge had closed down a public detention facility in order to make way for his private business […]

...more

More Rules of Writing

By

In 2001, Elmore Leonard, famous for his crime fiction and suspense thrillers, wrote a spicy essay for The New York Times cataloging his suggestions for good writing, or, rather, he lists what we shouldn’t do. He continues his list of do-nots, in 10 Rules of Good Writing, reviewed here by The Christian Science Monitor.

...more