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Posts by: Tony DeGenaro

Natasha Trethewey Gulfing!

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Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey is flexing her foreign diplomacy muscles in the Persian Gulf for National Poetry Month. On April 24, Trethewey will be participating in a public interview at the Abu Dhabi International Bookfair, to kick off the massive list of events they have planned. She will also be reading at American University of Sharjah a […]

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Mystery in Golden Gate Park

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Boo Radley of “To Kill a Mockingbird” apparently moved to San Francisco. A few weeks ago, in SF’s beloved Golden Gate Park, a small wooden elf door appeared, covering a notch in a tree. The community responded positively, putting wishes, trinkets, and other little treasures (ala Boo for Scout). The Richmond District neighborhood blog has an in-depth […]

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Nabil Nahas is Painting With Starfish

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Ranging widely from densely textured works on canvas formed with layers of an acrylic and pumice mixture on top of silicon molds to abstract representations of the native olive and cedar trees of Lebanon, Nahas’s work consistently oscillates between many aesthetic sensibilities, ultimately driven by his almost religious passion for abstraction. Native Lebanese painter Nabil […]

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Vampire Weekend is Doing Odd Things

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New York indie band Vampire Weekend somehow have proven that music videos are still culturally relevant. Earning them the response, “Vampire Weekend are a bunch of dicks,” the music video for their song “Diane Young” (which is great) shows an older Saab burning with the New York City skyline looming behind it. Patrick George saw […]

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Slow Clap

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Megan Garber gives an exceptionally detailed breakdown of applause in this essay, which analyzes the history and evolution of the everyday gesture. So the subtleties of the Roman arena — the claps and the snaps and the shades of meaning — gave way, in later centuries, to applause that was standardized and institutionalized and, as a result, a […]

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National Poetry Month

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April Fools and the beginning of National Poetry Month? Seems like a killer day to us! [April 1] marks the start of National Poetry Month, the monthlong celebration of the verse inaugurated in 1996 by the Academy of American Poets. The April initiative aims to highlight the legacy and achievements of America’s poets, and is among […]

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Make Mine a Double Decker

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San Francisco residents (or anyone amused by public transportation shenanigans) should look no further than Muni Diaries’s Five Best Muni Moments. Favorite: “a rider saw two guys selling Starbucks coffee beans out of a suitcase on the back of the 22-Fillmore. Entrepreneurial spirit, no?” Tweet your SF Muni moments or follow for some light reading during those […]

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Amazon.com & Goodreads Link Up

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Today, the Goodreads’ social network of book reviews and reading suggestions was acquired by online retail giant Amazon. While we are super bummed about this, Russ Grandinetti, Amazon’s Vice President, says: “Amazon and Goodreads share a passion for reinventing reading. Goodreads has helped change how we discover and discuss books and, with Kindle, Amazon has helped expand reading […]

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Putting Tracks on the Map

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Jay Shells, an artist currently working in New York, is taking favorite rap lyrics and putting the tracks on the map … all over the Big Apple. This project, which Shells calls “Rap Quotes,” consists of homemade but very official-looking street signs bearing rap lyrics at the specific locations of the songs they appear in. For example, […]

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Joshua Mohr on Recklessness

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Joshua Mohr, novelist and San Francisco resident, sits down with HTML Giant’s Weston Cutter to discuss craft, and his newest novel, Fight Song, in this brilliant interview: As artists, evolution is important. Learning and growing is important. I want to have the kind of career where I give myself permission to explore all kinds of aesthetics and […]

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The Believer Turns Ten!

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Brooklyn’s Greenlight Bookstore saw McSweeney’s publication The Believer celebrate its tenth anniversary this Monday. “The Believer’s staff is all over the country, and we communicate primarily via email, so events like this are great because you get to spend time with the community around the magazine and really see email come alive,” Andrew Leland, one of […]

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Sounds of Leigh Newman’s “Still Points North”

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“The story was there in the music, down to the epilogue.” Leigh Newman’s memoir, Still Points North: One Alaskan Childhood, One Grown-up World, One Long Journey Home, gets a unique treatment over at Largehearted boy‘s Booknotes, a column where authors are asked to compile a sort of soundtrack to their process. It gives very rich context […]

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Radio Ambulante en inglés Coming Soon!

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Join members of Radio Ambulante‘s first-ever English broadcast next Monday on KALW! Daniel Alarcón, executive producer, explains the fresh perspective of Ambulante’s mission: We begin from the premise that political boundaries may be real, but cultural boundaries are fluid. Our program is for Latin Americans, for Latinos, for everyone who delights in a well-told story. A […]

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“Michael Kimball Writes Your Life Story”

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Vaguely reminiscent of our very own Letters in the Mail, Michael Kimball’s new book, Michael Kimball Writes Your Life Story (on a postcard) reinvents memoir in a way that would have Montaigne going postal. In his review, Joseph Riipi shares some of the itemized moments captured in Kimball’s collection, from facts that are clerical (“According to postcard […]

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“Has the Vinyl Revival Gone Too Far?”

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A.V. Club contributor Jason Heller places his bets on the (suspected to be short) future of the vinyl revival in this article about the reissue of Kenny Rogers’ The Gambler. Observing a risky trend in artificial rarities, Heller argues new traditions like Record Store Day are leaning more towards manipulative marketing than celebration of nostalgia. […]

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Alphabetical Straightjacket: Future Dictionaries

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“For most of its life, the dictionary has been limited by alphabetical order. That was the default way to navigate through the text … so if you wanted to see all the terms for, say, a loose woman that were used in the 19th century, with a couple of clicks you could get all that […]

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