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Posts Tagged: black women

Exorcising Whiteness: Khalisa Rae’s Ghost in a Black Girl’s Throat

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Rae presents America as seen through Black girls’ eyes, experienced by our bodies.

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Black Motherhood as Literary Creation: Talking with Kaitlyn Greenidge

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Kaitlyn Greenidge discusses her new novel, LIBERTIE.

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On Resilience, Tender Rituals, and Responsible Love: Talking with Kiese Laymon

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Kiese Laymon discusses the revised HOW TO SLOWLY KILL YOURSELF AND OTHERS IN AMERICA.

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Belonging Is Everything: Talking with Georgina Lawton

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Georgina Lawton discusses her debut memoir, RACELESS.

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Complicating Unhelpful Binaries: Talking with Deesha Philyaw

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Deesha Philyaw discusses her debut story collection, THE SECRET LIVES OF CHURCH LADIES.

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Freedom Knows Who We Are: Talking with Kelly Harris-DeBerry

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Kelly Harris-DeBerry discusses her debut poetry collection, FREEDOM KNOWS MY NAME.

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Stories without Veils: Talking with Athena Dixon

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Athena Dixon discusses her debut memoir-in-essays, THE INCREDIBLE SHRINKING WOMAN.

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Identity as a Hall of Mirrors: Descent by Lauren Russell

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This book is a marriage of the real world and the imagination, the nexus of nonfiction and fiction.

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Against Respectability: A Conversation with Raven Leilani

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Raven Leilani discusses her debut novel, LUSTER.

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Hybrid by Nature: A Conversation with Tara Campbell

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Tara Campbell discusses her new book, POLITICAL AF: A RAGE COLLECTION.

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Bald-headed Muthaf*cker

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Healing is slow. Fast. Slow again.

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Consider Us Women: A Conversation with Kwoya Fagin Maples

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Kwoya Fagin Maples discusses her poetry collection, MEND.

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VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Renee Simms

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Renee Simms discusses her debut collection, Meet Behind Mars, leaving law to become a writer, and writing through major life changes.

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VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Morgan Jerkins

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Morgan Jerkins discusses This Will Be My Undoing, getting her start on the Internet, and why her collection of linked personal essays isn’t just another Millennial read.

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To Look for America: A Road Trip, a Soundtrack

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One thing I was taught about travel—because my father is a black man born in Alabama in 1950—was that there are safe places for black people to go and places that aren’t as safe.

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VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Brooke C. Obie

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Brooke C. Obie discusses the historical basis for her debut novel, Book of Addis, writing to dismantle white supremacy, and why Black speculative fiction is integral to her survival.

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Nikki Wallschlaeger

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Nikki Wallschlaeger discusses her new collection Crawlspace, why she chose to work with the sonnet form, and how segregation in American never ended.

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VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Yona Harvey

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Yona Harvey talks about her path to becoming a poet, Winnie Mandela as an artistic inspiration, and what it means to write more publicly.

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This Week in Trumplandia

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Welcome to This Week in Trumplandia. Check in with us every Thursday for a weekly roundup of the most pertinent content on our country, which is currently spiraling down a crappy toilet drain. You owe it to yourself, your communities, and your humanity to contribute whatever you can, even if it is just awareness of […]

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VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Tara Betts

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Tara Betts discusses her newest collection, Break the Habit, the burden placed on black women artists to be both artist and activist, and why writing is rooted in identity.

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The Sunday Rumpus Interview: A Roundtable on Writing, Editing, and Race

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With Lisa Factora-Borchers, Patrice Gopo, Jennifer Niesslein, Tamiko Nimura, and Deesha Philyaw.

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A Running Start

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Over at The Offing, Linda Chavers pens an important letter to “black girls everywhere”: I am giving you the prologue. You must go forward accepting and understanding that no one will ever do it as well as you do, and no one will ever tell you that you do it better than anybody else.

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Who Are You Writing For?

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In the American imagination the black woman, whether light skinned or dark, is already a sexualized entity, a character upon which so many stereotypes are projected. But as a black woman writing these characters, I need to write beyond the stereotypes, expose their idiocy one page at a time. Morgan Jerkins writes about the complications […]

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Representing Black Women’s Stories

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Why do black characters, in particular, black women of color, have to have some curated, Huxtable-like experience? Why can’t black women, like every other human on earth, be sexual, nerdy, outrageous, or flawed? Why aren’t we allowed to share our stories of affairs, unrequited love, career failures and sexual diversity on camera? For Blavity, Kayla […]

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The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Josie Pickens

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Josie Pickens talks about building relationships through blogging, changing the narrative around black women in America, and eradicating silence through storytelling.

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“Happily Ever After” for African-American Romance Novelists

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Romance novels can’t erase the past, and the present. Chapter by chapter, they do strive toward agency.

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