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Posts Tagged: Paris Review

The Inward Place: A Conversation with Claudia Dey

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Claudia Dey discusses her first American release, HEARTBREAKER.

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Here’s Your Beginning: A Conversation with Lynn Freed

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Lynn Freed discussions her recent essay collection, The Romance of Elsewhere, the importance of a good first sentence, and the risks involved in writing irony.

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Drawing Close to the Void: Talking with Patty Yumi Cottrell

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Patty Yumi Cottrell discusses her debut novel, Sorry to Disrupt the Peace, how she accesses “the enraptured state” to write, and dreaming as an art form.

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How Yellow Is Yellow Enough?

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At the Paris Review, Monica Youn discusses her latest “Twinkie” poem, “Goldacre,” written after last year’s Best American Poetry controversy: It was around the same time that I first heard the insult “Twinkie”—yellow on the outside, white on the inside—a label I brooded over. New acquaintances seemed surprised, judgmental, to learn that I couldn’t speak Korean, had […]

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Publishing’s Culture of Positive

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Recently, Jessa Crispin shocked the literary world by announcing she would be closing Bookslut, the literary blog she started fourteen years ago. Since then she has stirred some controversy, calling the Paris Review “boring as fuck” (the Paris Review took the critique in stride, offering a 10% discount with the code BORINGASFUCK) and attacking online literary […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Mark Leyner

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Mark Leyner discusses his new novel, Gone with the Mind, about a failed novelist, Mark Leyner, who gives a reading to his mom in an almost-deserted food court.

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The British and American Henry James

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The memorial in Chelsea Old Church tactfully describes him as “a resident of this parish who renounced a cherished citizenship to give his allegiance to England in the first year of the Great War”—the “cherished” insisting from the grave that James had been a good American. The Paris Review marks the hundredth anniversary of Henry James’s […]

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Remembering Paul West

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The Paris Review remembers Paul West, an absurdist author of over fifty books. Excerpts from his satire, Portable People, can be found here: Fat men are the wisest dreamers. I always ate up sleep, on my back or side virtually weightless, and here in a cell on the lip of oblivion I still munch the same […]

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