Film

Lone Star Cinema

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In clinging to a set of memories that fade more every day, maybe I’m also clinging to an idyllic version of my own past. ...more

Susan Sarandon, “Bernie Bro” Politics, and White Privilege

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As a longtime fan, it pains me to say it, but Sarandon is everything that's wrong with mainstream, non-intersectional white feminism. ...more

Casting JonBenét and the Pageantry of Brokenness

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It is an uncomfortable admission, but we hunger for stories that sensationalize the extremes of human behavior. We want to crawl under the police tape and see the outlines of bodies. ...more

Don’t Think Twice and the Power of Improvising through the Unknown

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It’s a little extraordinary when you realize that you’re the one getting in your own way. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #77: Hauschka

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Lion could be a simple homecoming story, the prodigal son returning to the place he was born. Except, the son in question was six when he left. Now, he’s twenty-six and his story is far from simple. Garth Davis’s film, like his TV offering Top of the Lake, is a beautiful, emotional rollercoaster. 

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The Rumpus Mini Interview Project #75: Deborah Kampmeier

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I met Deborah Kampmeier at a workshop in November. We were two weeks post-election; the room was raw with emotion, and electric with conversations about resistance. This tall, badass woman dressed in all black sauntered into the room, and chose a seat at the table.

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Oscars Flub as Grand Finale for Camp

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On the Hollywood stage—amidst gasps, jaw drops, and pearl clutches—we witnessed one final, beautifully coded failure and an over-the-top dethroning of the serious. ...more

Safety Nets: On Seeing Movies with My Children

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There’s no blueprint for any of this. If there were, I would have read it by now. ...more

The Future of Body Horror: Can Our Art Keep up with Our Suffering?

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The individuality of body horror is its signature attribute. Nothing is more intimate than one’s own body, and by extension, one’s own physical suffering. ...more

The Rumpus Review of La La Land

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Fantasy needs reality “because it’s only with the real backdrop that it works at all,” and reality needs fantasy to challenge its façade ...more

Macho Prey: Homophobia and Unlikely Victims in Tickled

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The film only grazes the issue, but homophobia is the fuel of the harassment that the targets face. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #58: James Steven Sadwith

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A self-described “actor’s director,” James Steven Sadwith has been writing, directing, and producing television movies, miniseries, and dramas for nearly three decades—and is perhaps best known for his work on the lives of Frank Sinatra and Elvis. But for Coming through the Rye, his first feature film for the big screen, Sadwith comes closer to home, chronicling in fictional form the journey he himself embarked upon as a youth.

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The Rumpus Review of Nate Parker’s The Birth of a Nation

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Parker set out to bring a different kind of “slavery movie” to audiences. And it is different. ...more

Rising Above the Rink: Remembering Bill Nunn

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In those little moments, a higher truth emerges from above the rink: with some humor, peace becomes more possible. ...more

The Rumpus Review of Bridget Jones’s Baby

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Perhaps Bridget fans who watched the movies but never read the books might not find this movie to be such a hard blow... But those who read the books—and those who loved the pilgrim soul in Bridget—will feel the loss more keenly. ...more

The Rumpus Review of The Light Between Oceans

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I wanted so badly to invest in the characters, to cry and feel their pain, but I felt detached. ...more

Sound & Vision: Brendan Toller

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Allyson McCabe talks with Brendan Toller about his love of vinyl records, buying music in local stores, and his latest documentary film Danny Says, an examination of publicist and manager Danny Fields. ...more

The Rumpus Review of One More Time with Feeling

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“We didn’t ask for it,” Cave begins another poetic flight, and again we think he’s talking about something ghastly, “but it’s all around us, a gratuitous beauty.” ...more

You’ve Got Mail and the Internet of Ordinary People

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You’ve Got Mail was one of the first movies to depict the Internet as it affects the lives of ordinary users. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Review of The Lost Arcade

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In the past couple of years it has become nearly impossible to avoid a certain genre of New York documentary that can best be described as urban eulogy. But The Lost Arcade, directed by Kurt Vincent and written by Irene Chin, isn’t just another wistful goodbye to the dirty boulevards of pre-gentrification New York.

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Florence Foster Jenkins, Meryl Streep, and White Feminism

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Streep’s career encapsulates the mid-to-late 20th century ideal of American whiteness as aspirational and as attainable. ...more

The Rumpus Review of Seoul Searching

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Seeing is a critical part of normalizing, and though it seems like a rudimentary expectation, it’s important for American audiences to see Korean-Americans simply living their lives. ...more

The Rumpus Review of Ghostbusters

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An agenda can only exist when there is a contingent opposing it. We only push for representation when so many hours and characters of wrath are poured into keeping us out. ...more