Posts Tagged: manic pixie dream girl

Growing Up with ADHD

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Despite the narrative that we are over-diagnosing ADHD in children, symptoms of ADHD often go unrecognized in girls. At the Toast, Grace Lidinsky-Smith discusses navigating grade school with undiagnosed ADHD, her experiences with feelings of shame, and the impact of finally receiving treatment:

I wanted to write this for my younger self, and for all girls who keep silent and try to be obedient despite the ruckus in their skulls.

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The Rumpus Interview with Kristopher Jansma

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Kristopher Jansma discusses his second novel, Why We Came to the City, facing adulthood in his thirties, and working through grief and loss in writing. ...more

John’s Pixie Dream Girls

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Mary Jo Tewes Cramb discusses the perpetuation of the “manic pixie dream girl” stereotype in John Green’s novels:

In Green’s novels, there is considerable tension between the potent appeal of his manic pixie characters, the excitement and fun they bring into the narrators’ lives, and the messages these characters impart about their own lives and identities.

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Working Girls of Laura Jean Libbey

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Katja Jylkka, writing over at The Toast, looks at the working girl novels of Laura Jean Libbey—19th century love stories featuring “innocent,” “bewitching” heroines. Though these pretty young women were able to attract “the wolfish attention of every male in [their] vicinity” just like modern-day manic pixie dream girls, Libbey’s working girls differentiate themselves by exerting agency:

…the original Mary Sues tended to show young women and ethnic minorities in positions of leadership and power, where before they were relegated to minor roles.

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From Manic Pixie Dream Girl to Stable Banshee Real Woman

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“I’m fascinated by this character and what she means to people,” writes Laurie Penny about the Manic Pixie Dream Girl archetype, “because the experience of being her—of playing her—is so wildly different than it seems to appear from the outside.”

In an essay for The New Statesman, Penny explores not just the way the trope functions in film and books, but also the way our inherent human addiction to narrative causes us to project MPDG-ness onto certain women—or even ourselves.

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